Lo! by Charles Fort Book Summary

Title: Lo!
Author: Charles Fort

TLDR: “Lo!” is a groundbreaking work that challenges conventional scientific thinking by presenting a vast collection of unexplained phenomena—from strange creatures and objects falling from the sky to mysterious disappearances and luminous aerial objects—arguing for a more interconnected and intimate cosmos than envisioned by traditional science.

Part I

Chapter 1:

Fort begins by presenting a series of seemingly unrelated, bizarre phenomena: naked men in city streets, horse tracks in volcanic mud, dripping black forms in the sky, showers of frogs, and blizzards of snails. He argues that these seemingly preposterous occurrences are no more extraordinary than everyday events, simply because our perception of “ordinary” is itself arbitrary and conditioned by societal norms.

Fort then explores the concept of “underlying oneness,” suggesting a fundamental connection between seemingly disparate phenomena. He points to examples in the natural world where patterns in mineral formations prefigure the forms of plants and animals, highlighting the deep-rooted similarities between the organic and inorganic. This idea of interconnectedness extends to seemingly unrelated events, like the appearance of a new star and the unexplained dripping of oil on a girl in England, prompting Fort to question the true nature of “remoteness” and the limitations of human understanding.

To demonstrate this interconnectedness, Fort introduces the recurring phenomenon of “showers of living things,” presenting numerous documented instances of frogs, fish, worms, and even snails falling from the sky. He dismisses the conventional explanation of whirlwinds segregating and depositing these creatures based on their specific gravity, arguing that whirlwinds create chaotic mixtures, not homogeneous falls of specific organisms. He suggests that if whirlwinds are not responsible, a selective force must be at play, purposefully distributing these creatures.

Fort concludes the chapter by proposing a radical idea: that our existence might be a single organism, which he metaphorically refers to as “God.” This organism, like any biological entity, has mechanisms for distributing resources and maintaining its internal balance, perhaps explaining the purposeful distribution of living organisms.

Chapter 2:

Fort shifts his focus from the specific phenomena of falling organisms to the broader concept of organization and explanation within our existence. He acknowledges that scientific explanations often work well in practical applications, but argues that they are ultimately based on circular definitions and a fundamental misunderstanding of the interconnected nature of reality. He criticizes the scientific tendency to define things in terms of themselves, a practice he deems indicative of “feeble-mindedness” and compares to the reverence held for mentally afflicted individuals in some cultures.

Fort proposes an alternative perspective: viewing existence as a whole, as an organism, rather than analyzing its isolated parts. This perspective, he suggests, might allow us to understand the workings of existence in a similar way that individual cells within an organism could understand the functions of the entire body. However, he emphasizes that this idea is not a metaphysical proposition; instead, it aims to conceptualize our specific existence within a defined framework.

Returning to the phenomenon of “showers of living things,” Fort argues that the selective and distributive force behind them might be the organism itself, functioning in a manner similar to the distribution of oxygen in the lungs or nutrients in the stomach of a biological organism. He posits the existence of a “transportory force” he calls Teleportation, a mechanism by which the organism distributes matter across its various parts. He anticipates accusations of relying on fabrications and hoaxes, acknowledging that some data might be unreliable, but emphasizing that he offers the information for further consideration.

Chapter 3:

Fort delves into the specific case of “manna,” an edible substance reported to fall from the sky in Asia Minor. He distinguishes between two types of “manna”: a sugar-like substance secreted by insects and a fibrous, convoluted substance that can be ground into flour. Fort focuses on the latter, presenting numerous accounts of these edible lumps falling in Asia Minor over centuries.

He interprets these occurrences within the framework of his organic existence theory. He suggests that in the past, when a group of humans needed sustenance, the organism provided it in the form of “manna.” While the continued sporadic falls of “manna” might seem illogical, Fort proposes that it could be a symbolic gesture, a remnant of a previous function maintained for the sake of continuity. Alternatively, the “manna” might symbolize a broader favoritism bestowed upon those who received it in the past, granting them abundance in various forms throughout history.

Fort then addresses the conventional explanation for these falls: whirlwinds carrying a lichen called Lecanora esculenta from Algeria to Asia Minor. He challenges this explanation by pointing out that no such “manna” showers have been reported in Algeria or any location between Algeria and Asia Minor. He compares this scenario to the improbable idea of tumbleweeds only showering in Canada despite being prevalent in the western United States. He dismisses the whirlwind explanation as a forced, overly simplistic attempt to assimilate the phenomenon into existing scientific knowledge.

He concludes by reiterating his belief in the existence of a “purposeful distribution” within our existence, suggesting that “manna” might be just one example of a wider mechanism for transporting substances and organisms from other parts of our organic existence, which may encompass the solar system and its surrounding stars.

Chapter 4:

Fort focuses on seemingly teleported flows of stones and water, questioning the arbitrary line drawn between the acceptable and unacceptable in the realm of unexplained phenomena. He begins with the account of a localized, continuous rainfall on a small area in Noirfontaine, France, for two days despite clear skies. He uses this example to highlight the lack of objective standards in our understanding of reality and the inherent limitations of appealing to authority for validation.

Fort criticizes both science and religion for their shared role in suppressing unconventional knowledge, arguing that progress often stems from challenging established beliefs. He criticizes the blind faith placed in science by laypeople, who, he argues, use science as an outlet for their gratitude without acknowledging the opposition and resistance faced by scientists who propose new ideas.

He presents a series of accounts involving the seemingly teleported movement of stones and water. He notes the frequently reported phenomenon of stones falling from an unidentifiable source, sometimes witnessed by large crowds and defying the conventional explanation of mischievous neighbors. He points to accounts of water mysteriously appearing in closed rooms, soaking furniture without any visible source or sign of passage through walls. He dismisses conventional explanations like “exudations from insects” as inadequate, considering the reported volume of water involved.

Fort links these phenomena to the “agency” of children, suggesting that they might be more attuned to teleportation due to their atavistic connection to an earlier stage in human development, where teleportation was more prevalent and necessary. He speculates on the possible applications of teleportation, envisioning a future where it facilitates transport and even interplanetary travel. He emphasizes the playful origins of many practical inventions, suggesting that seemingly absurd phenomena like teleporting stones could pave the way for groundbreaking technological advancements.

Chapter 5:

Fort expands his exploration of Teleportation, moving beyond stones and water to include more diverse objects like soot, nails, and coins. He highlights the case of a house in Magilligan, Ireland, where flows of soot and stones occurred simultaneously, defying the conventional explanations of either mischievous neighbors (for the stones) or a simple chimney malfunction (for the soot).

He criticizes both spiritualists and conventional scientists for their rigid and exclusive approaches to analyzing unexplained phenomena. He argues that spiritualists prematurely attribute all such events to “the departed,” while scientists dismiss anything that contradicts their established knowledge. Fort advocates for a more open and integrative approach, aiming to break down the artificial boundaries between disciplines and to find commonalities between seemingly disparate phenomena.

He then presents a series of accounts involving the teleportation of nails, corn, money, and even chunks of coal. He highlights the recurring themes of localized repetitions, suggesting enduring transportory currents, and the occurrence of phenomena within closed rooms, challenging the notions of both conventional science and spiritualist beliefs. He points to the case of a family in Battersea, London, experiencing flows of coins and coal in closed rooms, emphasizing their bafflement and the inadequacy of conventional explanations.

Fort concludes by proposing a more expansive view of “Nature,” where seemingly bizarre events like teleporting coins are understood as natural processes, akin to the flow of rivers. He envisions a future where Teleportation is harnessed for practical applications, revolutionizing transportation and commerce.

Chapter 6:

Fort tackles the controversial subject of blood flowing from religious statues, a phenomenon often dismissed as ludicrous. He argues that even seemingly preposterous events can be considered plausible within the framework of Teleportation. He suggests that if water can mysteriously appear within objects like houses (as seen in previous chapters), other fluids, like blood, could similarly appear within other objects, such as religious statues. He cites the Swanton Novers case, where various oils and water flowed from ceilings, as further support for this possibility.

Fort then explores the potential role of “agency” in Teleportation, proposing that priests, especially in the past, might have possessed the knowledge or ability to teleport blood onto statues, consciously or unconsciously. He suggests that these “miracles” could have served to organize and coordinate social growths, highlighting the potential for purpose within an organic existence. However, he acknowledges the apparent absurdity of such a system, where miracles are seemingly necessary for achieving what could be achieved without them.

He draws parallels between the seemingly miraculous flows of water in open fields, their subsequent appearance in houses, and the eventual harnessing of electricity by humans. He suggests that blood flows from statues could be a specialized application of a wider, natural phenomenon, akin to humans becoming “agents” in the use of lightning through their understanding of electricity.

Fort then connects these ideas to the phenomenon of stigmata, flows of blood from points on living individuals. He argues that if one accepts the occurrence of stigmata, the extension of this phenomenon to statues is not implausible. He presents the case of James Walsh, a devout boy in Templemore, Ireland, where statues and religious pictures in his home and workplace began to bleed. Fort acknowledges the possibility of trickery, but highlights the broader context of violence and unrest in Ireland at the time, suggesting a potential connection between societal turmoil and the manifestation of such phenomena.

He describes the mass pilgrimage to Templemore, triggered by reports of bleeding statues. He notes the simultaneous occurrences of a mysteriously refilling hollow in the floor of Walsh’s room and the alleged movement of objects in an unseen force, linking these events to the broader concept of poltergeist phenomena. He concludes by emphasizing that, while he cannot definitively explain the events at Templemore, he proposes poltergeist phenomena as a plausible framework for understanding them.

Part II

Chapter 7:

Fort explores the concept of “teleportative currents” and their selectivity, focusing on the sudden appearances of various living creatures, ranging from giant snails in Ceylon to lynxes in Scotland. He draws a connection between the bend of a neck to the ground for grazing and the limited perspective of vegetarianism, criticizing the focus on eating only plants as a “semi-ideal” and advocating for a more expansive view.

He presents the case of a massive infestation of giant African snails (Achatena fulica) in a small, densely populated area of Kalutara, Ceylon, in 1910. He emphasizes the suddenness of the infestation, with millions of snails appearing overnight, covering trees and the ground. He criticizes the conventional explanation that the infestation stemmed from two snails accidentally introduced through a parcel of vegetables, highlighting the lack of evidence and the improbable speed of the population explosion. He argues that the phenomenon points to a selective transportory force, similar to the “manna” showers discussed in previous chapters.

Fort then presents several other cases of sudden, localized appearances of creatures, including alligators in New Jersey and New York, young crocodiles in England, and brown mice in Scotland. He observes a pattern of teleportation seemingly favouring immature and larval forms of life, questioning the reasoning behind such a seemingly inefficient system. He acknowledges the possibility of hybrid creatures as an explanation, even presenting the case of a cow giving birth to both lambs and a calf, but ultimately emphasizes the limitations of conventional explanations and the potential for extra-terrestrial origins.

He concludes by reiterating his concept of “transportory currents” and the selective force behind them, speculating that humans might unconsciously, or even consciously through research, learn to harness this force for their own purposes.

Chapter 8:

Fort examines the challenges of judging the validity of his data and exploring the philosophical implications of his theories. He acknowledges the lack of objective standards for evaluating unexplained phenomena, criticizing both those who blindly dismiss his data as fabrication and those who embrace it with unquestioning faith. He argues that human reasoning is ultimately guided by the prevailing norms of the era, comparing the logic of scientific thought to the blossoming of a tree in its appropriate season. He proposes that human minds, like parts of a growing plant, do not need independent standards for judgment; instead, they are guided by the inherent logic of the wider organism, which he metaphorically refers to as “God.”

He explores the concepts of continuity and discontinuity, suggesting that the interconnectedness of all phenomena makes it impossible to truly isolate and define any individual element, while the uniqueness of each appearance simultaneously creates barriers to understanding. He highlights the limitations of inductive logic, arguing that even the most rigorous scientific pronouncements are ultimately based on circular reasoning and are subject to revision as new knowledge emerges.

He uses the example of Lowell’s planet, initially lauded as a triumph of astronomical prediction but later found to have significantly different characteristics than calculated, to demonstrate the fallibility of even the most esteemed scientific pronouncements. He criticizes the astronomers’ tendency to dismiss contradictory evidence and to overestimate their own accuracy, comparing their selective acceptance of data to the process of digestion. He argues that photographic astronomy, in contrast to mathematical astronomy, allows for more flexible interpretations, potentially supporting alternative views of the cosmos.

Fort concludes by reiterating his belief in an organic existence, where human thoughts, like rocks and trees, are products of specific eras and are guided by the logic of the wider organism. He emphasizes his role as a pragmatist, acknowledging the workability of many scientific explanations in practical applications but questioning their philosophical validity as absolute truths.

Chapter 9:

Fort delves deeper into the mystery of unexplained creatures, focusing on instances where conventional explanations like hybridization or escaped exotic animals seem inadequate. He acknowledges the human tendency to exploit unexplained phenomena for personal gain, citing the example of a hoax “Jersey Devil” exhibited in Philadelphia, but emphasizes that even established branches of science are susceptible to fabrication and distortion.

He presents a series of accounts of monstrous creatures reported in various parts of the world, including a pig-like creature with a lobster tail found in Australia, a stag with antlers seen in New Zealand after a volcanic eruption, and a 30-foot long monster terrorizing the residents of Euroa, Australia. He connects these appearances to instances of seemingly teleported objects and living creatures discussed in previous chapters, speculating that some of these unexplained beasts might have been transported to this Earth from other parts of an organic existence.

He observes a pattern of strange animals appearing in the wake of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, proposing a potential link between these events within his organic existence framework. He suggests that the organism might purposefully teleport restorative organisms to desolate areas, akin to the regeneration of injured tissues in a biological organism. He supports this idea by citing cases of astonishingly rapid plant growth in volcanically devastated regions.

He discusses the limitations of conventional explanations for these strange creatures, acknowledging the possibility of hybridization but highlighting the resistance among some biologists to accepting the viability of bizarre hybrids. He contrasts the dogmatism of astronomers with the relative open-mindedness of biologists, attributing this difference to the humbling nature of studying other living creatures compared to the awe-inspiring, yet potentially misleading, vastness of the cosmos.

Fort concludes by reiterating his belief in the possibility of extra-terrestrial origins for some of these unexplained creatures, while also acknowledging the potential for undiscovered, or misidentified, terrestrial creatures. He emphasizes the mystery surrounding the sudden appearances and disappearances of these creatures, suggesting that their ephemeral nature might be a deliberate strategy employed by explorers from other worlds to avoid close scrutiny.

Chapter 10:

Fort examines the phenomenon of unidentified luminous objects, or “lights in the sky,” speculating that some might be living creatures while others could be vessels of explorers from other parts of our existence. He criticizes the dismissive approach of conventional science towards these phenomena, highlighting the tendency to rely on simplistic explanations and to avoid genuine investigation.

He presents the case of recurring luminous objects observed near Brown Mountain, North Carolina, emphasizing their unusual movement and brilliance, which defy explanations based on conventional astronomical phenomena like meteors. He criticizes the superficial investigation conducted by a geologist from the US Geological Survey, who attributed all the reported lights to mundane sources like car headlights and bush fires, without adequately addressing the unique characteristics described by witnesses. He argues that this investigation exemplifies the unwillingness of some scientists to seriously consider data that challenges their preconceptions.

Fort then presents a series of accounts of unexplained lights observed in various locations, including England, Ireland, and Sumatra. He notes the common theme of these lights appearing and disappearing mysteriously, often associated with specific locations, suggesting the existence of enduring, localized “transportory currents.” He draws connections between these lights and the unexplained falls of objects and creatures discussed in previous chapters, proposing that they might be different manifestations of the same underlying force, Teleportation.

He highlights the recurring theme of “agency” in these accounts, particularly the involvement of children, suggesting that children might be more attuned to these occult forces due to their connection to an earlier stage of human development. He speculates that some individuals, like the alleged “rainmakers” of certain cultures, might have consciously or unconsciously developed the ability to manipulate these forces.

He concludes by emphasizing the potential significance of these unexplained lights, suggesting that they might represent the vehicles of explorers from other worlds or evidence of advanced civilizations existing within a nearby starry shell. He proposes that a systematic and open-minded investigation of these phenomena could lead to groundbreaking discoveries, potentially revolutionizing our understanding of the cosmos and paving the way for interplanetary travel.

Chapter 11:

Fort further explores the concept of Teleportation, focusing on mysterious disappearances and their potential connection to the seemingly teleported appearances discussed in previous chapters. He criticizes the conventional scientific approach to these phenomena, arguing that the focus on explaining away the inexplicable often leads to the suppression of valuable data. He highlights the inherent bias in scientific investigations, comparing the selection of acceptable data to the process of digestion, where unwanted information is simply rejected.

He presents the perplexing case of the Marie Celeste, an American brigantine found abandoned in 1872 with no trace of its crew despite perfect sailing conditions and no signs of distress or foul play. He suggests that Teleportation might explain this disappearance, proposing that a selective force could have transported the crew, leaving the vessel and its cargo untouched. He dismisses alternative explanations like meteoric impacts or piracy as inadequate, given the lack of evidence and the specific circumstances of the case.

Fort then presents a series of accounts of other unexplained ship disappearances, including the Rosalie, the Cyclops, and the Naronic. He observes the recurring themes of ships vanishing without a trace, leaving behind only minimal debris or empty lifeboats. He challenges the conventional explanations of icebergs, piracy, or mechanical failures, highlighting the lack of supporting evidence and the unusual circumstances surrounding these disappearances. He speculates that an unknown force might be responsible for seizing these vessels, potentially for the purpose of abducting their crews.

He extends his Teleportation theory to include the disappearance of individual humans, presenting cases like the vanishing of Dorothy Arnold in New York City and the sudden disappearance of a young man from a street in South London, who later reappeared in a dazed state miles away. He highlights the recurring theme of memory loss associated with these teleportations, suggesting that the experience might erase or suppress memories related to the event.

He concludes by suggesting that Teleportation might be used criminally or commercially, envisioning a future where cargo and passengers are transported instantaneously across vast distances. He encourages an open-minded investigation into these unexplained disappearances, arguing that they might offer clues to a powerful force with the potential to revolutionize transportation and communication.

Chapter 12:

Fort addresses the often-dismissed phenomenon of blood flowing from religious statues, arguing that it can be assimilated into his broader concept of Teleportation. He draws parallels between the seemingly impossible appearance of water within closed rooms (discussed in previous chapters) and the equally improbable manifestation of blood on statues, suggesting that both could be examples of a selective transportory force at work.

He acknowledges the conventional explanation of fraud and trickery, particularly the case of the Princess Caraboo, a young woman who claimed to be a Javanese princess but was later exposed as an impostor. However, Fort meticulously dissects the evidence surrounding this case, highlighting inconsistencies in the accounts and suggesting that the “confession” attributed to Caraboo might be a forgery, designed to quickly and convincingly dismiss the mystery. He argues that the case, stripped of its fabricated elements, points to a genuinely unexplained appearance.

Fort then presents a series of accounts of mysterious strangers appearing in various locations, speaking unknown languages and behaving in ways suggestive of extra-terrestrial origins. He examines the case of Joseph Vorin, a man found wandering in Germany claiming to be from a distant land called Laxaria, and the case of a young man arrested in Paris who spoke a language identified by various experts as Spanish, Italian, and even Russian Doukhobor. He highlights the difficulty of verifying these individuals’ claims, acknowledging the prevalence of imposture but also suggesting that conventional explanations often rely on overly simplistic assumptions and disregard genuinely perplexing details.

Fort emphasizes the recurring theme of clothes, or the lack thereof, in these accounts. He notes that several “mysterious strangers” have been found naked, suggesting that a selective teleporting force might transport individuals without their clothing. He presents the case of a naked man found running wild on Lord Carnarvon’s estate near the time of Carnarvon’s death, potentially linking this event to the curse associated with the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb.

He concludes by examining the enigmatic figure of Cagliostro, a man of unknown origins who rose to prominence in 18th century Europe, claiming to possess supernatural powers. He challenges the conventional identification of Cagliostro as Joseph Balsamo, a Sicilian criminal, arguing that the evidence supporting this claim is flimsy and potentially fabricated by authorities seeking a scapegoat for the infamous Necklace Affair. He points to the lack of reliable witnesses and the questionable nature of handwriting analysis as evidence, suggesting that Cagliostro’s true identity and origins remain a mystery.

Chapter 13:

Fort delves into the topic of mysterious disappearances, focusing on cases that defy conventional explanations and potentially align with his concept of Teleportation. He dismisses the dismissive attitude towards unexplained phenomena as a form of intellectual laziness, comparing it to a pre-Columbus explorer briefly venturing into the ocean and declaring the non-existence of America based on that limited experience.

He begins by presenting the extremely brief, yet profoundly mysterious, case of Benjamin Bathurst, a British diplomat who vanished in 1809 while examining horses during a journey through Germany. He vanished in plain sight, leaving behind no trace or explanation. Fort notes the lack of any credible theory explaining Bathurst’s disappearance, highlighting the enduring mystery surrounding this event.

Fort then explores the broader context of unexplained disappearances, citing the alarmingly high number of people who vanish without a trace annually, according to police records. He challenges the assumption that most of these cases are eventually resolved conventionally, arguing that even seemingly straightforward explanations often rely on shaky evidence and a desire for closure rather than a genuine understanding of the circumstances.

He presents a series of accounts of unexplained disappearances, ranging from a young man vanishing inside a factory in Michigan to the disappearance of prominent individuals like Ambrose Bierce and Conant, an editor of Harper’s Weekly. He emphasizes the recurring theme of these individuals vanishing without any discernible motive or premeditation, leaving behind no clues or explanations for their sudden absence. He draws parallels between these cases and the mysterious appearances discussed in previous chapters, suggesting a potential connection between unexplained arrivals and departures.

He speculates on the possibility of human beings being teleported without their knowledge, perhaps experiencing brief lapses in consciousness or memory associated with the event. He compares this phenomenon to the common dream of finding oneself naked in a public place, suggesting that this dream might reflect a subconscious awareness of a real possibility.

Fort concludes by suggesting that a systematic and open-minded investigation into these unexplained disappearances could reveal a powerful, unknown force at work, potentially offering insights into the interconnected nature of our existence and the possibility of instantaneous travel across vast distances.

Chapter 14:

Fort further explores the theme of mysterious disappearances, focusing on the blurring lines between disappearance and teleportation. He questions the tendency to readily accept conventional explanations, particularly when they rely on circumstantial evidence and disregard perplexing details.

He presents the case of a marauding animal terrorizing sheep in Ennerdale, England, in 1810. The creature, described as killing sheep by biting into their jugular vein and sucking their blood, sparked a massive hunt involving hundreds of people. Eventually, a large dog was shot, and the killings ceased. However, Fort challenges this seemingly straightforward conclusion by highlighting the lack of evidence directly linking the dog to the killings and the unusual nature of the attacks, which are atypical of even aggressive dogs.

He then presents a series of similar cases from Ireland and England, where unexplained creatures slaughtered sheep, often leaving the carcasses largely uneaten and displaying unusual bite patterns. In each case, a dog was eventually blamed, and the mystery seemingly resolved. However, Fort meticulously analyzes the reports, pointing out inconsistencies in the timelines and descriptions, and highlighting the recurring theme of “scene-shifting,” where the killings abruptly cease in one location only to resume in a distant area shortly afterward.

He draws parallels between these accounts and the cases of seemingly teleported objects and creatures discussed in previous chapters, suggesting that a selective transportory force might be at work, replacing one creature with another to maintain a semblance of order and predictability. He speculates on the existence of an “occult police force,” a hidden mechanism within the organic existence that acts to suppress disruptive phenomena and divert human attention away from the truly inexplicable.

He extends this idea to include the mysterious disappearances of humans, suggesting that some individuals might be teleported to distant locations, with their memories erased or suppressed to prevent them from revealing the true nature of their experience. He presents the case of an unidentified man found dead in a field in Hampshire, England, naked and bearing no signs of foul play, as a potential example of a teleported individual who perished due to exposure and disorientation.

Fort concludes by reiterating his belief in the existence of Teleportation as a “natural force,” a mechanism used by the organic existence to maintain balance and distribute resources. He emphasizes the prevalence of misinformation and misdirection in our understanding of these phenomena, arguing that conventional explanations often serve to obscure rather than illuminate the truly perplexing aspects of our reality.

Chapter 15:

Fort broadens his discussion of Teleportation, examining its potential role in the larger context of organic existence. He argues that seemingly random occurrences like showers of frogs or teleportations of stones might be manifestations of a purposeful system, designed to maintain balance and ensure the continuity of life on Earth.

He suggests that Teleportation, as a distributive force, once played a vital role in populating new environments and providing sustenance to struggling communities. However, as human societies developed more sophisticated mechanisms for survival, the need for Teleportation diminished, leaving behind only vestigial manifestations, like the sporadic falls of “manna” or the sudden appearances of exotic creatures. He compares this process to the development of a biological organism, where early, rudimentary structures are gradually replaced by more specialized organs as the organism matures.

Fort examines the geographical distribution of resources and civilizations on Earth, highlighting the concentration of fertile lands, mineral deposits, and enduring civilizations in the northern hemisphere. He suggests that this pattern might reflect an intentional design, a purposeful preparation for the development of human societies in the north. He points to the longer days and milder climate of the Arctic compared to the Antarctic as further evidence of this potential bias.

He explores the concept of “reservations” within organic existence, drawing parallels between dormant buds on trees, unused sperm in a hive, and the relative isolation of Australia and the Americas before their colonization by Europeans. He suggests that these “reservations” represent a form of automatic foresight, a mechanism for preserving potential resources and opportunities for future use.

Fort argues that human history itself might reflect the workings of a larger organism, where nations rise and fall, interact and conflict, according to a plan beyond human comprehension. He suggests that wars, plagues, and other forms of human suffering might be expressions of “super-metabolism,” a process by which the organism eliminates excess populations and maintains its internal balance.

He concludes by envisioning a future where humanity, facing the pressures of overpopulation and dwindling resources, might turn to Teleportation as a means of colonizing other parts of our existence. He predicts a future where humans, driven by the same pioneering spirit that spurred their ancestors to explore uncharted lands and seas, will embark on daring expeditions to the stars, establishing new settlements and discovering new forms of life.

Chapter 16:

Fort challenges the prevailing astronomical view of a vast, isolated solar system, arguing for a more intimate and interconnected cosmos where stars are relatively close to Earth and exert a direct influence on terrestrial events. He criticizes the astronomers’ reliance on mathematical calculations and their tendency to dismiss contradictory evidence, suggesting that their “aristocratic” detachment from direct observation has led to a distorted and incomplete understanding of the universe.

He examines the concept of “mass” in astronomical calculations, arguing that it is a meaningless abstraction in a constantly changing universe where the fundamental constituents of matter are still unknown. He points to the shifting estimates of Mars’ mass, adjusted after the discovery of its moons, as evidence of the inherent uncertainty in these calculations. He compares the astronomers’ reliance on “mass” to the theologians’ reliance on “souls,” both representing attempts to impose artificial constants onto a fluid and dynamic reality.

Fort criticizes the astronomers’ reliance on prediction as proof of their theories, arguing that eclipses and other celestial events can be predicted equally well regardless of whether the Earth is stationary or in motion. He highlights the inaccuracies in astronomical predictions, citing the case of Lowell’s planet and the discrepancies in eclipse forecasts, to demonstrate the limitations of their supposed precision.

He proposes an alternative explanation for celestial periodicities, based on an inherent tendency towards regularization rather than gravitational forces. He compares the sustained movement of planets within a starry shell to the beating of a heart within a biological organism, suggesting that both are maintained by the life force of a larger entity.

Fort presents a series of challenges to conventional astronomical beliefs, questioning the validity of parallax measurements, spectroscopic determinations, and photographic evidence. He points to inconsistencies in these observations, such as negative parallax and the conflicting spectroscopic analyses of Lowell’s planet, to demonstrate the subjective nature of astronomical interpretations. He argues that the camera, like other scientific instruments, is subject to human bias and manipulation, selectively capturing and emphasizing data that supports prevailing theories.

He concludes by suggesting that a paradigm shift in astronomy is imminent, driven by the increasing number of unexplained observations and the growing dissatisfaction with conventional explanations. He predicts a future where the vast distances ascribed to stars will be dramatically reduced, leading to a more intimate and interconnected view of the cosmos, potentially paving the way for human exploration of the stars.

Chapter 17:

Fort continues his critique of conventional astronomy, focusing on the phenomenon of “new stars” and their implications for our understanding of the universe. He argues that the astronomers’ failure to observe and incorporate these celestial events into their models has led to a distorted and incomplete view of the cosmos, akin to the early geologists’ ignorance of fossils and sedimentary rocks.

He highlights the astronomers’ reliance on the collision theory to explain new stars, despite the lack of any direct observations of stars colliding and the improbability of such events occurring with the frequency implied by the number of observed new stars. He criticizes the astronomers’ claim to be able to spectroscopically identify the remnants of stellar collisions, even when those remnants appear as a single point of light through telescopes, arguing that this ability is unsubstantiated and smacks of intellectual arrogance.

Fort presents a series of historical accounts of new stars appearing in conjunction with terrestrial disturbances like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and unexplained falls of dust and ash. He observes that these correlations often occur in specific geographical zones, suggesting a localized connection between particular areas of Earth and certain regions of the sky. He argues that this pattern defies the conventional model of a vast and isolated solar system, where any part of Earth should be equally susceptible to influences from any star.

He criticizes the astronomers’ dismissive attitude towards amateur observations, highlighting the numerous instances where new stars were discovered by amateur astronomers while professional observatories remained oblivious. He attributes this discrepancy to the professionals’ reliance on mathematical calculations and their disdain for “empirical” observations, arguing that their focus on abstract theorizing has blinded them to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the cosmos.

Fort suggests that new stars might represent volcanic eruptions in a nearby starry shell, a landmass surrounding Earth and potentially harboring life. He compares the sudden brightening of a faint star to the unexpected eruption of a dormant volcano on Earth, suggesting that both might be triggered by internal processes within a larger organism. He proposes that the dust and ash observed falling on Earth at the time of new star appearances might be volcanic ejecta from these stellar eruptions, carried across a relatively short distance to our planet.

He concludes by reiterating his belief in a more intimate and interconnected cosmos than envisioned by conventional astronomy. He suggests that the stars, far from being trillions of miles away, are relatively close to Earth and exert a direct influence on our planet, potentially heralding a future where humans can embark on voyages to the stars and explore a vast and habitable landmass in the sky.

Chapter 18:

Fort further explores the concept of “new stars” as potential evidence for a nearby, habitable starry shell, while continuing his critique of conventional astronomy and its reliance on inaccurate predictions and dismissive explanations. He highlights the ironic contrast between the astronomers’ grand pronouncements about the vastness and remoteness of the cosmos and their consistent failure to observe significant celestial events, often relying on amateur astronomers to alert them to new discoveries.

He presents a series of cases where new stars were initially missed by professional observatories, only to be later identified on photographic plates after amateur astronomers reported their observations. He points to the case of Nova Cygni III, discovered by amateur astronomer W.F. Denning in 1920, a star that had brightened significantly over several days and was easily visible to the naked eye, yet remained unnoticed by professional astronomers until Denning’s report prompted them to examine their own photographic records. Fort suggests that this recurring pattern of professional oversight reveals a fundamental flaw in the astronomers’ approach, their reliance on abstract mathematical models blinding them to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the cosmos.

He further challenges the astronomers’ accuracy, contrasting their elaborate calculations spanning billions of years with their relatively poor predictions of events like eclipses, often off by several seconds or even minutes. He argues that these discrepancies, while seemingly insignificant compared to the vast timescales invoked by astronomers, demonstrate the fundamental limitations of their predictive powers and cast doubt on their claims of precision.

Fort returns to the concept of “companion stars,” arguing that these alleged binary systems, often invoked to explain variations in stellar brightness, are largely based on flimsy evidence and theoretical assumptions. He points to the ever-shifting “determinations” of the “dark companion” of Algol and the discrepancies in observations of Sirius’s “light companion” as evidence of the subjective nature of these interpretations, often adjusted to fit prevailing theories rather than reflecting genuine observational data.

He then presents the case of Nova Pictoris, a star that suddenly increased in brightness in 1925, only to be discovered months later by an amateur astronomer while professional observatories remained oblivious. Fort highlights the subsequent splitting of this star into multiple components, a phenomenon reminiscent of volcanic eruptions on Earth, as further evidence for a more dynamic and interconnected cosmos than envisioned by conventional astronomy. He suggests that the nebulous rings observed expanding from Nova Pictoris, similar to rings of smoke and dust emitted by terrestrial volcanoes, might carry material across space, potentially explaining the dust falls and atmospheric disturbances observed on Earth at the time of new star appearances.

Fort concludes by proposing that a paradigm shift in astronomy is underway, a shift away from the paradigm of a vast, empty, and indifferent universe towards a view of a more intimate and interconnected cosmos, where stars are relatively close to Earth, exert a direct influence on our planet, and potentially harbor life. He envisions a future where humans, freed from the constraints of outdated astronomical dogmas, will embark on journeys to the stars, exploring a vast and habitable landmass in the sky.

Chapter 19:

Fort revisits and expands upon his theory of a nearby, habitable starry shell, drawing upon several key phenomena discussed in previous chapters. He emphasizes the concept of “organic control,” a force guiding events within our existence and orchestrating seemingly unrelated occurrences to maintain a balance between continuity and change.

He presents a series of interconnected events, beginning with the mysterious creature slaughtering sheep in Northumberland in 1904. The creature’s behavior, described as vampiric and exceeding the capacity of any known animal, sparked a massive hunt involving the renowned bloodhound Monarch. However, Monarch failed to track the creature, suggesting its potential absence or a supernatural nature. Fort then connects this event to the simultaneous religious revival sweeping through Wales and England, noting the accompanying reports of unexplained lights in the sky, suggesting a potential correlation between the heightened emotional fervor of the revival and the manifestation of unusual phenomena.

He details the spread of the revival, its ecstatic fervor leading to mass hysteria, bizarre behavior, and even cases of insanity. He connects this social upheaval to a surge in reports of unexplained occurrences throughout Great Britain: teleportations, hauntings, mysterious fires, and strange suicides. Fort suggests that the revival, by tapping into a more primitive and less rational aspect of human consciousness, might have created conditions conducive to the manifestation of phenomena typically suppressed by the rationalism of modern society.

He then returns to the Northumberland sheep killings, noting the eventual discovery of a dead wolf on a railway line, conventionally explained as the culprit. However, Fort highlights the inconsistencies in this explanation, pointing out that the wolf was significantly larger and more mature than the escaped wolf-cub initially blamed for the killings. He suggests that the organism, in its efforts to maintain a semblance of order and predictability, might have replaced the wolf-cub with a more suitable scapegoat, teleporting the dead wolf from a distant location to provide a convenient explanation. He proposes a similar explanation for the discovery of an otter on a railway line after a series of unexplained poultry killings near Newcastle.

Fort then extends this concept of “organic control” to the case of Kaspar Hauser, a young man who appeared mysteriously in Nuremberg in 1828, seemingly devoid of any knowledge of human society or the world around him. He challenges the conventional explanations of Hauser as either an impostor or an abandoned idiot, highlighting the numerous unexplained aspects of his case, such as his rapid acquisition of language and knowledge, his peculiar accent, his reported ability to see in the dark, and the three seemingly inexplicable attacks upon him, culminating in his murder.

Fort suggests that Hauser might have been a “wolf child,” not raised by wolves, but subjected to a teleportative experience that erased his memories and left him in a state of profound amnesia. He draws parallels between Hauser’s case and the case of the English boy found in Nepal with no memory of his past, arguing that both individuals might have been teleported from distant locations and subjected to a mental obliteration process designed to obscure their true origins. He connects Hauser’s eventual murder to the potential threat his case posed to the established order, suggesting that the organism might eliminate individuals who challenge its carefully constructed illusion of predictability.

Fort concludes by emphasizing the interconnectedness of seemingly unrelated phenomena, arguing that events like religious revivals, unexplained creature attacks, and the appearance of mysterious individuals like Kaspar Hauser might be different expressions of a single underlying force, a force manipulating events and orchestrating occurrences to maintain the balance and continuity of our existence. He suggests that this force, while seemingly indifferent to human suffering, might ultimately be acting in accordance with a plan beyond human comprehension, a plan designed to guide the evolution and development of our existence.

Chapter 20:

Fort resumes his argument for a stationary Earth within a nearby, rotating shell of stars, presenting a series of challenges to the conventional astronomical view of a vast and isolated solar system. He emphasizes the subjectivity of human perception and the limitations of relying on “appearances” as evidence, arguing that both the geocentric and heliocentric models are based on interpretations of visual phenomena and neither can be definitively proven.

He criticizes the astronomers’ reliance on mathematical calculations, highlighting their use of the concept of “mass” as a fundamental unit despite the fact that the true nature of matter remains unknown. He argues that this reliance on abstract concepts, divorced from a true understanding of their underlying reality, leads to circular reasoning and a false sense of certainty. He points to the constantly shifting estimates of planetary masses, adjusted as new observations emerge, as evidence of the inherent uncertainty in these calculations.

Fort challenges the astronomers’ claims of predictive power, arguing that the accuracy of their forecasts, often touted as proof of their theories, is often exaggerated and selectively emphasized. He points to the discrepancies in eclipse predictions, sometimes off by significant margins, and the miscalculations surrounding Lowell’s planet as evidence of the limitations of astronomical predictions, particularly when dealing with events that can be readily verified by direct observation.

He proposes an alternative explanation for celestial periodicities, based on an inherent tendency towards regularization rather than gravitational forces. He compares the rhythmic movements of celestial bodies to the cyclical patterns observed in nature, such as the seasons, the tides, and the biological rhythms of living organisms, suggesting that these regularities reflect a fundamental ordering principle within our existence.

Fort then presents a series of visual observations that, he argues, support his theory of a nearby, rotating starry shell. He points to the “dark nebulae,” dark patches in the night sky, as potential glimpses of a solid shell surrounding our Earth. He highlights the “Horse-head nebula,” a dark, cloud-like formation resembling a mountain peak, as a potential projection from this shell, illuminated from behind by a light source that cannot penetrate its solid mass.

He suggests that the apparent vastness of the cosmos might be an illusion, speculating that many of the faint points of light we perceive as distant stars might be reflections of sunlight off irregularities on the starry shell. He proposes that the variations in brightness observed in some stars, particularly those with periods of approximately one year, might be caused by the changing angles of sunlight reflecting off celestial lakes or dormant volcanic craters on this shell.

Fort concludes by envisioning a future where humanity, freed from the constraints of outdated astronomical dogmas, embarks on explorations of this nearby starry shell, discovering new lands, new resources, and perhaps even new forms of life. He suggests that the twinkling Milky Way, far from being a distant galaxy, might one day become a celestial “Broadway,” teeming with human activity and illuminated by the signs and symbols of our expanding civilization.

Chapter 21:

Fort continues to amass evidence for his theory of a nearby starry shell, focusing on the phenomenon of insect swarms and their potential connection to extra-terrestrial events. He argues that these sudden, massive appearances of insects, often comprising exotic or unknown species, defy conventional explanations based on terrestrial migration patterns and point to a teleportative force distributing these creatures from a distant source.

He begins by presenting the case of a massive swarm of long, black flies that appeared over Havre, France, in 1880, seemingly originating from a point over the English Channel and descending upon the city, exhausting themselves and falling into the streets and harbor. He notes similar swarms appearing in Nova Scotia and England shortly afterward, suggesting a common origin for these events, potentially located beyond Earth.

Fort then details the extraordinary case of the insect swarms that plagued England in the summer of 1869. He highlights the unprecedented scarcity of insects in England that year, with many common species virtually disappearing, creating an “insect famine” that even impacted bird populations. He then describes the sudden influx of billions of insects, many belonging to foreign or unknown species, that descended upon England in waves, covering towns and fields, clogging rivers and streams, and darkening the sky. He emphasizes the suddenness and scale of these appearances, defying conventional explanations based on terrestrial migration or wind patterns.

Fort meticulously analyzes the accounts of these swarms, highlighting the recurring themes of sudden appearances, localized repetitions, and the lack of observations of these insects migrating across the English Channel or originating from any known terrestrial location. He challenges the conventional explanation proposed by the Entomological Society of London, attributing the swarms to insects migrating to France and then being blown back to England by winds, arguing that this explanation disregards the enormous volume of insects involved, the presence of foreign and unknown species, and the localized nature of the appearances.

He then presents the case of the 1921 insect swarms in England, noting a similar pattern of scarcity followed by a sudden influx of insects, including exotic fireflies, locusts, and unknown stinging insects. He connects these events to the severe drought that England experienced that year, suggesting a potential relationship between terrestrial need and the teleportation of insect swarms from a distant source, potentially a fertile region within the starry shell.

Fort concludes by proposing that these insect swarms, like the showers of frogs and other creatures discussed in previous chapters, might represent a purposeful distribution mechanism employed by the organic existence to maintain balance and replenish depleted populations. He suggests that the organism, responding to the “prayers” of a parched and insect-deprived England, teleported swarms of insects from a distant, abundant source to restore the ecological equilibrium.

Chapter 22:

Fort focuses on the phenomenon of sudden, localized deluges, or “cloudbursts,” arguing that they defy conventional meteorological explanations and point to a mechanism of “functional teleportation,” a purposeful distribution of water from a distant source to areas experiencing drought. He connects these deluges to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, suggesting a complex interplay between these events within the context of an organic existence.

He presents a series of dramatic accounts of cloudbursts occurring in various parts of the world, highlighting the suddenness and intensity of these downpours, often causing devastating floods and significant loss of life. He describes a watery fist punching through a dry creek bed in Australia, smashing a truck and killing its driver, and a wall of water sweeping through a dried-up stream bed in Kansas, destroying a carriage and its passengers. He recounts the terrifying scene of trees crashing through houses in Spain during a sudden deluge, uprooting families from their beds.

Fort criticizes the conventional scientific approach to analyzing these events, arguing that the focus on localized meteorological explanations ignores the broader context of simultaneous and interconnected phenomena occurring across the globe. He challenges the notion of “coincidence” often invoked to dismiss these correlations, suggesting that the frequent concurrence of cloudbursts, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions points to a deeper underlying mechanism at work.

He presents the case of the widespread deluges that occurred in March 1913, describing the catastrophic flooding in Ohio, the overflowing rivers in New York and New Jersey, the unprecedented snowstorms in Texas and Oklahoma, and the torrential downpours in Europe, South Africa, South America, and Australia. He emphasizes the global scale of this event, defying explanations based solely on local weather patterns.

Fort connects these deluges to volcanic activity, highlighting the “afterglows” observed in various locations, a phenomenon associated with volcanic eruptions. He notes the absence of any known terrestrial volcanic eruption that could account for these atmospheric effects, suggesting a potential extra-terrestrial origin, perhaps an eruption in a nearby starry shell.

He then examines the case of the 1889 global deluges, highlighting the extreme droughts preceding these events and the enormous falls of water that brought both relief and devastation to various parts of the world. He draws a parallel between the response of an organism to a localized injury, deploying resources to repair damaged tissues, and the seemingly purposeful distribution of water from regions of abundance to drought-stricken areas.

Fort argues that the efficacy of prayer for rain, often dismissed as superstition, might actually reflect a genuine phenomenon, a response of the organic existence to the collective need expressed through prayer. He suggests that the organism, much like a compassionate individual, responds to the pleas of its suffering parts, albeit sometimes with overwhelming and destructive force.

He concludes by reiterating his concept of “functional teleportation,” a mechanism by which the organism distributes resources, including water, across its various parts to maintain balance and ensure continuity. He proposes that the seemingly random and chaotic nature of these deluges might be part of a larger plan, a grand orchestration of events beyond human comprehension.

Chapter 23:

Fort further explores the interconnectedness of seemingly unrelated phenomena, focusing on the correlation between volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and other atmospheric disturbances, including unexplained falls of dust and ash, red rain, green moons, and “dry fogs.” He argues that these events, often dismissed as coincidences or explained away with simplistic, localized theories, actually point to a complex, interconnected system operating across vast distances, potentially linking Earth to events occurring within a nearby starry shell.

He begins by highlighting the case of the destructive earthquake that devastated Roggiano, Italy, in 1887. He notes the survivors’ reports of “fires in the heavens” preceding the earthquake, a phenomenon dismissed by investigating scientists as a “jest” or “coincidence,” despite the lack of any conventional explanation for such a celestial display. Fort argues that this dismissal exemplifies the scientific tendency to disregard data that challenges their preconceived notions and their reluctance to consider connections between seemingly disparate phenomena.

He then examines the 1906 earthquake in Valparaiso, Chile, noting the reports of a “terrible darkness” and a blazing sky preceding the event. He criticizes the seismologist Count de Ballore for dismissing these reports, attributing them to searchlights or tramcar lights, a clearly inadequate explanation considering the scale and intensity of the observed phenomena. Fort argues that Ballore’s dismissal, like the scientists’ reaction to the Roggiano sky-fires, demonstrates the blinding effect of dogmatism, preventing even intelligent individuals from recognizing potentially significant correlations.

Fort presents a series of other cases where unusual atmospheric phenomena have preceded earthquakes, including red suns in the Caucasus, a green moon in India, and sudden, torrential downpours in Assam. He connects these events to known volcanic phenomena like “dry fogs,” dense clouds of volcanic dust and ash that can obscure the sun and moon, giving them a reddish or greenish hue. He suggests that these “dry fogs,” originating from a volcanic eruption somewhere beyond Earth, might have reached the skies of these earthquake-prone regions shortly before the tremors, potentially serving as a warning signal, albeit one unrecognized by the affected populations.

He then details the catastrophic earthquake that struck Assam, India, in 1897, highlighting the unusual phenomena preceding the event, including the green moon, the torrential downpours, and the sudden appearance of a lake-sized mass of water falling from a clear sky at the moment of the quake. He describes the devastating effects of the earthquake, the violent ground movements, the collapsing buildings, the shifting landscapes, and the widespread loss of life.

Fort criticizes the official investigations of the Assam earthquake, focusing on the reports by Dr. Oldham and Dr. Charles Davison, both of whom ignored the unusual atmospheric phenomena preceding the event and attributed the earthquake solely to local, subterranean causes. He argues that this selective focus on localized explanations, while conforming to conventional scientific dogma, overlooks potentially crucial evidence for a broader, interconnected system operating beyond Earth.

He draws parallels between the volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and deluges occurring in Assam and similar, simultaneous events happening in Mexico and other parts of the world. He proposes a theory of “electrolytic currents” flowing between volcanic regions on Earth and volcanoes located in a nearby starry shell, suggesting that these currents might transmit energy and matter, triggering earthquakes and transporting volcanic discharges across space.

Fort concludes by emphasizing the recurring pattern of unexplained atmospheric phenomena preceding earthquakes, suggesting that these events might be more than mere coincidences, but rather indicators of a complex, interconnected system operating across vast distances, linking terrestrial events to celestial phenomena and potentially heralding a future where humans, with a more comprehensive understanding of this system, might be able to interpret these warnings and mitigate the devastating effects of earthquakes.

Chapter 24:

Fort delves deeper into the concept of “volcanoes in the sky,” arguing that new stars, often dismissed as distant and unrelated to Earth, might actually be relatively nearby volcanic eruptions occurring within a starry shell, directly influencing our planet through teleportative currents carrying volcanic discharges, including dust, ash, and even meteors. He criticizes the prevailing astronomical dogma that discounts the possibility of such connections, highlighting the astronomers’ tendency to ignore inconvenient data and rely on simplistic, localized explanations.

He presents a series of interconnected events spanning decades, linking new star appearances to terrestrial disturbances like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and unexplained atmospheric phenomena. He meticulously analyzes these events, highlighting the recurring themes of zone-phenomena, where these disturbances occur along specific latitudes, suggesting a connection between particular areas of Earth and certain regions of the sky, a pattern inconsistent with the conventional astronomical model of a vast and isolated solar system.

Fort begins with the 1892 events, linking the black, fiery tornado that tore across Georgia to earthquakes in Italy, a mysterious glare in the sky observed in New York, a fall of unidentified dust in Indiana, seismic waves in the Atlantic and Lake Michigan, unseasonable snow in Alabama, and volcanic eruptions in New Zealand, Samoa, the West Indies, and Italy. He notes the simultaneous occurrence of a new star in the constellation Auriga, discovered by an amateur astronomer after professional observatories failed to notice it, and suggests that the dust that fell in Indiana, analyzed by some as volcanic in origin, might have originated from this newly erupted star, traveling a relatively short distance to reach Earth.

He then examines a series of other new star appearances between 1896 and 1899, each coinciding with terrestrial disturbances like deluges, volcanic eruptions, and falls of dust and ash. He highlights the recurring theme of amateur astronomers discovering these new stars while professional observatories remain oblivious, attributing this pattern to the astronomers’ reliance on abstract mathematical models and their neglect of direct observation.

Fort focuses on the 1901 appearance of Nova Persei, a brilliant new star discovered by an amateur astronomer, again missed by professional observatories despite its impressive brightness. He notes the unusual atmospheric phenomena preceding the star’s appearance: deep greenish-yellow clouds darkening the sky, black substance falling in Michigan, unseasonable coldness in Europe, and red substance falling with snow in England. He connects these events to potential volcanic discharges originating from the newly erupted star, suggesting a direct link between this celestial event and terrestrial disturbances.

He then presents the controversial case of the 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee in Martinique, where 30,000 people perished after authorities, relying on the pronouncements of two scientists who dismissed the volcano’s activity as non-threatening, prevented them from evacuating the city of St. Pierre. Fort argues that the scientists’ localized focus on Pelee, ignoring the wider context of simultaneous volcanic eruptions and earthquakes occurring across the globe, led to a tragic misjudgment and highlights the dangers of dogmatically clinging to limited, conventional explanations.

He further analyzes the 1902 events, linking the massive smoke clouds observed over the ocean between the Philippines and Australia to the unprecedented dust storms and fireballs that bombarded Australia, noting the simultaneous earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occurring in various parts of the world. He proposes that these interconnected events might have been triggered by a massive volcanic eruption occurring in the southern constellation Puppis, where a new star was discovered around the same time. He emphasizes the localized nature of the fireballs that fell on Australia, arguing that this pattern suggests a stationary Earth, as a moving Earth would have moved away from the trajectory of these fireballs, making their repeated impacts on the same region highly improbable.

Fort concludes by reiterating his theory of “volcanoes in the sky,” proposing that new stars represent eruptions occurring within a nearby starry shell, potentially habitable and teeming with volcanic activity. He argues that these eruptions, through teleportative currents, transmit matter and energy to Earth, triggering earthquakes, deluges, and other atmospheric disturbances. He emphasizes the recurring pattern of these correlations, dismissing the conventional explanation of “coincidence” as inadequate and calling for a more open-minded investigation into the interconnected nature of our existence, potentially leading to a revolutionary understanding of the cosmos and our place within it.

Chapter 25:

Fort continues his exploration of the interconnected nature of seemingly disparate phenomena, focusing on the remarkable correlation between celestial events, specifically new star appearances and “auroral” beams of light, and terrestrial catastrophes like earthquakes and deluges. He presents a series of compelling cases spanning decades, arguing that these events, often dismissed as mere coincidences by conventional science, might actually reflect a complex, interconnected system operating across vast distances, potentially linking Earth to events occurring within a nearby starry shell.

He meticulously analyzes these cases, highlighting the recurring theme of simultaneous occurrences of new stars, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unexplained falls of dust and ash, and “auroral” beams of light, often localized to specific geographical zones. He argues that this pattern, consistent with his theory of a stationary Earth within a rotating starry shell, defies the conventional astronomical model of a vast and isolated solar system, where no part of Earth should be particularly susceptible to influences from any specific star.

Fort begins by examining the 1905 earthquake in Calabria, Italy, noting the reports of luminous phenomena and a fall of dust preceding the event. He criticizes the scientist Prof. Agamennone for dismissing these reports, attributing the dust to a minor eruption of Stromboli despite evidence contradicting this explanation. Fort argues that this dismissal, like the scientists’ reactions to the Roggiano sky-fires and the Valparaiso lights discussed in previous chapters, exemplifies the detrimental effect of dogma on scientific inquiry, blinding even intelligent individuals to potentially significant correlations.

He then presents the case of the catastrophic 1897 earthquake in Assam, India, emphasizing the extreme drought plaguing the region before the event and the subsequent deluges that brought both relief and devastation. He connects these deluges to reports of a green moon, a red sunset, and falls of dust and mud observed in India shortly before and after the earthquake, suggesting a link between these atmospheric phenomena and a volcanic eruption occurring outside Earth. He argues that the localized nature of these events, particularly the falls of sandalwood-scented dust and mud, points to a directed, teleportative process rather than a random dispersal of dust from a distant terrestrial source.

He connects the Assam earthquake to simultaneous events occurring elsewhere on Earth, including earthquakes in Turkey, Calabria, and Spain, volcanic eruptions in Java and Guatemala, and a “rain blizzard” in Australia. He proposes that these interconnected events might reflect a chain reaction triggered by a volcanic eruption in a nearby starry shell, transmitting energy and matter through teleportative currents to various parts of Earth.

Fort then analyzes a series of other new star appearances, each coinciding with terrestrial disturbances like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unexplained lights in the sky, and falls of dust and ash. He highlights the 1907 and 1908 events, noting the falls of soot-like and ash-like substances from the sky preceding earthquakes and new star discoveries, and the 1910 appearance of Nova Lacertae, a new star shining brightly for weeks yet unnoticed by professional astronomers until discovered by an amateur.

He then examines the 1912 earthquake off the coast of Vancouver Island, noting the preceding unseasonable coldness in Europe and the fall of black rain in England, suggesting a potential link between these events and the new star discovered in the constellation Gemini shortly afterward. He highlights the 1918 earthquake in Italy, preceded by black rain in Ireland and a mysterious red glare in the sky observed across Europe and North America, connecting these events to a potential volcanic eruption occurring outside Earth, possibly reflected in the nighttime glare.

Fort concludes by presenting the 1918 appearance of Nova Aquilae, a brilliant new star discovered by two amateur astronomers in India and South Africa, again missed by professional observatories despite its impressive brightness. He connects this event to the earthquake that devastated San Francisco in 1906, highlighting the simultaneous volcanic eruption of Vesuvius, the earthquake in Formosa, and other seismic and volcanic activity occurring around the globe at the time. He argues that these interconnected events, defying conventional explanations based on coincidence or localized geological processes, point to a dynamic and interconnected cosmos, where events on Earth are directly linked to celestial phenomena, potentially heralding a future where humans, with a more comprehensive understanding of this system, can explore the nearby starry shell and discover a vast, habitable landmass teeming with life.

Chapter 26:

Fort shifts his focus from specific events to the broader philosophical implications of his theory of a stationary Earth within a nearby, rotating starry shell. He argues that this model, while challenging conventional astronomical dogma, offers a more coherent and integrative view of our existence, unifying seemingly disparate phenomena and potentially leading to a more profound understanding of our place in the cosmos.

He begins by revisiting the concept of “compromise” as a driving force in the evolution of knowledge, drawing upon Hegel’s idea of the “union of complementaries” arising from the conflict of extremes. He suggests that the longstanding debate between the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe might ultimately be resolved through a compromise, a new model incorporating elements of both views, acknowledging both the Earth’s relative stationariness and its subtle movements within a larger cosmic framework.

He emphasizes the subjectivity of human perception and the limitations of relying solely on visual “appearances” as evidence, arguing that both the geocentric and heliocentric models are ultimately based on interpretations of visual phenomena, neither offering definitive proof of its validity. He suggests that a more comprehensive understanding of the universe requires moving beyond a purely visual perspective, incorporating data from a wider range of observations and recognizing the interconnected nature of seemingly disparate phenomena.

Fort then revisits the concept of “organic control,” proposing that this force guides events within our existence, orchestrating seemingly unrelated occurrences to maintain balance and facilitate growth and development. He argues that this control, while seemingly indifferent to human suffering, operates according to a plan beyond human comprehension, a plan designed to ensure the continuity and evolution of our existence.

He draws parallels between the development of human technologies, often progressing from cumbersome and inefficient methods to more elegant and streamlined solutions, and the potential evolution of human understanding of the cosmos, moving from simplistic and localized explanations to a more comprehensive and interconnected view. He suggests that the laborious efforts of early explorers, pushing northward over treacherous ice floes, might be mirrored in humanity’s current efforts to understand the universe, our current astronomical models representing a primitive stage, destined to be superseded by a more sophisticated and elegant understanding as we gather more data and shed our outdated dogmas.

Fort then examines the question of the temperature and composition of outer space, challenging the conventional view of a vast, empty void filled with intensely cold and rarefied gas. He presents data from aviators and high-altitude balloon experiments suggesting the existence of warmer layers of air at high altitudes, potentially extending all the way to the starry shell. He argues that the conventional assumption of uniformly decreasing temperature with altitude, like the belief in a vast and empty outer space, might be based on limited data and a failure to recognize the potential for complexity and variation in this unexplored realm.

He addresses the issue of the Earth’s alleged motion, presenting data from aviator experiences, such as Colonel Lindbergh’s flights across the Atlantic and Admiral Byrd’s expeditions to the South Pole, that, he argues, contradict the conventional model of a rapidly rotating Earth. He notes the absence of any observable effects of the Earth’s alleged axial and orbital motions on these flights, suggesting that the air surrounding the Earth might not partake of these motions, as conventionally assumed, and that these observations are more consistent with a stationary Earth.

Fort concludes by reiterating his belief in a nearby, habitable starry shell, a vast landmass surrounding Earth and potentially teeming with life. He envisions a future where humans, freed from the constraints of outdated astronomical dogmas, embark on daring expeditions to the stars, exploring this new frontier, discovering new resources, and encountering new forms of life. He suggests that this exploration might not require the complex and laborious technologies envisioned by conventional science, but could be achieved through a more subtle understanding of the forces operating within our existence, potentially harnessing the power of teleportation to travel instantaneously across vast distances.

Chapter 27:

Fort continues to build his case for a nearby starry shell, scrutinizing conventional astronomical observations and highlighting their inconsistencies, while emphasizing the importance of amateur observations and challenging the dismissive attitude of professional astronomers towards data that contradicts their established beliefs. He focuses on the phenomenon of “new stars” as potential evidence for volcanic eruptions occurring within the starry shell, directly influencing Earth through teleportative currents carrying volcanic discharges.

He begins by revisiting the long-held assumption that stars are immensely distant, an assumption based on the lack of observable changes in their positions relative to each other over long periods. He draws a parallel between this assumption and the once widely accepted belief in a sparsely populated ocean floor, a belief shattered by the discoveries of deep-sea dredging. He argues that the astronomers’ reliance on this distance assumption, like the pre-dredging view of the ocean depths, might reflect a lack of sufficient data and a failure to recognize the potential for unexpected discoveries.

Fort then challenges the conventional explanation for the lack of observable stellar motion: the vast distances separating stars, making even significant movements appear minuscule from Earth. He points to the numerous “new stars” observed over the past century, many discovered by amateur astronomers, as evidence that significant changes do occur in the stars, visible from Earth despite their alleged vast distances. He argues that if stars were truly trillions of miles away, as conventionally believed, these new star appearances, representing massive increases in brightness, should be even rarer and more dramatic than observed, challenging the consistency of the distance explanation.

He criticizes the astronomers’ reliance on the collision theory to explain new stars, arguing that this theory, while offering a seemingly plausible explanation for these sudden increases in brightness, fails to account for the frequency of new star appearances and the lack of any direct observations of stars colliding. He further challenges the astronomers’ claim to be able to spectroscopically identify the remnants of stellar collisions, even when those remnants appear as a single point of light through telescopes, arguing that this alleged ability is unsubstantiated and reflects a dogmatic adherence to an inadequate theory.

Fort then examines the historical record of new star appearances, noting the recurring pattern of these events coinciding with terrestrial disturbances like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and unexplained falls of dust and ash. He highlights the case of Nova Aurigae, discovered by an amateur astronomer in 1892 after being missed by professional observatories, a star that had increased in brightness to the point of being visible to the naked eye yet remained unnoticed by those supposedly dedicated to observing the heavens. He suggests that this pattern of amateur discoveries, while embarrassing for professional astronomers, highlights the limitations of their approach, their reliance on abstract calculations and their neglect of direct observation rendering them blind to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the cosmos.

He details the case of Nova Persei, another new star discovered by an amateur astronomer in 1901, again missed by professional observatories despite its impressive brightness. He connects this event to the unexplained atmospheric phenomena observed on Earth around the same time, suggesting a potential link between this celestial eruption and the greenish-yellow clouds, falling black substances, and unseasonable coldness reported in various parts of the world. He proposes that these phenomena might be caused by volcanic discharges originating from the newly erupted star, carried across a relatively short distance to reach Earth, suggesting a closer and more interconnected cosmos than envisioned by conventional astronomy.

Fort concludes by emphasizing the significance of these new star appearances, arguing that they offer compelling evidence for a nearby, habitable starry shell, a vast landmass surrounding Earth and potentially teeming with volcanic activity. He suggests that these eruptions, through teleportative currents, transmit matter and energy to Earth, triggering earthquakes, deluges, and other atmospheric disturbances. He encourages a more open-minded approach to astronomical observation, recognizing the value of amateur contributions and challenging the dogmatism of the professional establishment, potentially leading to a revolutionary understanding of the cosmos and our place within it.

Chapter 28:

Fort continues his exploration of the connections between new star appearances and terrestrial disturbances, focusing on two significant events: the 1902 dust storms and fireballs in Australia and the 1903 dust falls across Europe and Africa. He meticulously analyzes these events, highlighting their unusual characteristics and challenging the conventional explanations offered by scientists, arguing that these events, like the other cases presented throughout the book, point to a teleportative force operating across vast distances, potentially linking Earth to a nearby starry shell.

He begins by examining the widespread smoke clouds observed over the ocean between the Philippines and Australia in October 1902, noting the subsequent dust storms, mud falls, and fireballs that bombarded Australia in November. He describes the extraordinary darkness, the sulphurous smells, the disrupted communications, and the fires ignited by falling fireballs, all suggesting a massive volcanic eruption. He challenges the conventional explanation attributing these events to forest fires in Borneo and Sumatra, citing the lack of any corroborating evidence from those regions and emphasizing the unusual scale and intensity of the Australian events.

Fort then connects these Australian occurrences to the simultaneous volcanic eruptions happening on Earth, including the major eruption of Kilauea in Hawaii, the geyser of fire from Santa Maria in Guatemala, the smoke discharges from Colima in Mexico, and eruptions in Samoa, the West Indies, Stromboli, and Peru. He argues that these widespread eruptions, while impressive, cannot fully account for the specific characteristics of the Australian events, particularly the dense smoke clouds observed weeks before the dust storms and the localized nature of the fireballs that fell on Australia. He suggests that a new star discovered in the southern constellation Puppis around the same time might be the source of these unexplained phenomena, potentially transmitting volcanic discharges through teleportative currents to the closest terrestrial region, Australia.

He then analyzes the 1903 dust falls across Europe and Africa, noting the widespread distribution of dust, from the western coast of Africa to England and across the European continent. He challenges the conventional explanation attributing these dust falls to a hurricane in the Sahara Desert, citing the lack of any corroborating evidence from African sources, particularly the absence of reports of any significant dust storms in newspapers and scientific journals covering the region.

Fort highlights the simultaneous occurrence of a massive dust storm in Australia, comparable in scale and intensity to the European event, starting just two days after the first dust fall in Africa. He argues that this coincidence, along with the lack of any reported dust falls in between these two continents, defies the conventional explanation of a single, localized dust storm in Africa, suggesting a common origin for both events, potentially a volcanic eruption in a nearby starry shell. He connects these events to a new star discovered in the constellation Gemini shortly afterward, proposing that this star, potentially a volcanic eruption within the starry shell, might have released vast quantities of dust that drifted to Earth, reaching both Europe and Australia.

He concludes by reiterating his concept of a nearby, habitable starry shell, suggesting that this vast landmass, teeming with volcanic activity, might be the source of the unexplained dust falls, fireballs, and other atmospheric disturbances observed on Earth. He argues that these events, linked through teleportative currents, demonstrate the interconnected nature of our existence, extending beyond our planet to encompass a larger cosmic organism. He criticizes the scientific community’s reluctance to consider such possibilities, their adherence to conventional explanations and their dismissal of inconvenient data hindering our understanding of the true nature of the cosmos.

Chapter 29:

Fort further develops his argument for a nearby starry shell, exploring a range of astronomical observations and highlighting their inconsistencies with the conventional model of a vast and isolated solar system. He focuses on the phenomenon of “companion stars,” arguing that the evidence for these alleged binary systems is often flimsy and subjective, frequently adjusted to fit prevailing theories rather than reflecting genuine observational data. He also re-examines the astronomers’ claims of accuracy, contrasting their elaborate calculations spanning billions of years with their relatively poor predictions of readily verifiable events like eclipses, further emphasizing the limitations of their approach.

He begins by highlighting the case of Capella, a star initially declared a spectroscopic binary based on observations by astronomer Campbell in 1899. He notes that several astronomers at Greenwich Observatory subsequently “confirmed” the existence of Capella’s companion star, only for later observations to reveal that this companion cannot be seen through any telescope. Fort argues that this case exemplifies the subjective nature of astronomical interpretation, influenced by pre-existing beliefs and expectations, and highlights the dangers of relying on “expert” pronouncements without critical scrutiny.

He then addresses the case of the Andromeda nebula, a celestial object conventionally believed to be millions of light-years away. He criticizes the astronomers’ past attempts to portray this nebula as a spiral galaxy, with images often artificially enhanced to emphasize a swirling motion, arguing that this interpretation reflects a bias towards the nebula theory of galaxy formation, now largely superseded by alternative models. He notes the recent shift in astronomical representations of the Andromeda nebula, with a focus on its stratified structure rather than a spiral shape, suggesting that astronomers see what they want to see, their interpretations influenced by prevailing paradigms.

Fort challenges the conventional explanation for the lack of observable motion in the Andromeda nebula: its immense distance, making even significant movements appear minuscule from Earth. He points to the numerous “new stars” observed within this nebula, over fifty documented cases, as evidence that significant changes do occur despite its alleged vast distance. He argues that if the Andromeda nebula were truly millions of light-years away, these new star appearances, representing massive increases in brightness, should be even rarer and more dramatic than observed, challenging the consistency of the distance explanation.

He then examines the astronomers’ claims of accuracy, contrasting their elaborate calculations spanning billions of years with their relatively poor predictions of easily verifiable events like eclipses, often off by several seconds or even minutes. He argues that these discrepancies, while seemingly insignificant compared to the vast timescales invoked by astronomers, demonstrate the fundamental limitations of their predictive powers and cast doubt on their claims of precision.

Fort returns to the concept of “companion stars,” meticulously analyzing the evidence for several alleged binary systems. He examines the “dark companion” of Algol, noting the constantly shifting “determinations” of its characteristics, with each new theory replacing its predecessor as new observations emerge, highlighting the lack of any definitive understanding of this alleged companion. He then scrutinizes the case of Sirius’s “light companion,” touted in textbooks as a classic example of a binary system with a precisely known orbital period, but pointing to scientific journals where discrepancies in observations are acknowledged, with the faint light near Sirius appearing in positions inconsistent with the calculated orbit. Fort argues that this selective presentation of data, emphasizing confirmations of established theories while downplaying contradictory evidence, creates a false impression of certainty and obscures the genuine complexities of these celestial phenomena.

He concludes by suggesting that the astronomers’ insistence on vast distances and intricate binary systems might be a desperate attempt to preserve their outdated model of the cosmos, a model increasingly challenged by unexplained observations and amateur discoveries. He proposes that the stars, far from being trillions of miles away, might be relatively close to Earth, potentially embedded within a nearby, rotating starry shell, a scenario that would readily explain the observed phenomena without resorting to improbable distances and convoluted theoretical constructs. He encourages a more open-minded and critical approach to astronomical observation, recognizing the value of amateur contributions and acknowledging the limitations of conventional wisdom, potentially paving the way for a revolutionary understanding of the cosmos and our place within it.

Chapter 30:

Fort continues his exploration of new star appearances, analyzing several notable cases from the early 20th century, highlighting their correlation with terrestrial disturbances and reinforcing his argument for a nearby, habitable starry shell. He criticizes the astronomers’ continued reliance on inadequate explanations like “coincidence” and their failure to recognize the potential significance of amateur observations, arguing that these failings impede our understanding of the true nature of the cosmos.

He begins by examining the 1909 discovery of a new star in the constellation Gemini, announced by the Kiel Observatory in Germany after an amateur astronomer, Enebo, alerted them to its existence. He notes the preceding earthquakes felt in the United States, the unusual intensity of these tremors prompting initial miscalculations of their epicenter by scientists at Harvard University, and the subsequent discovery of the actual epicenter near Triangle Island off the coast of British Columbia. Fort then connects these events to the fall of black rain observed in England around the same time, arguing that this rain, analyzed by some as potentially volcanic in origin, might be linked to the new star in Gemini, potentially carrying volcanic discharges across a relatively short distance to Earth.

He then details the 1913 discovery of a new star in the constellation Sagittarius, found on photographic plates six years after the images were captured, highlighting the astronomers’ obliviousness to this significant event despite its presence in their own data. He connects this new star appearance to the afterglow observed in several European countries seven days after the star reached its peak brightness, a phenomenon conventionally associated with volcanic eruptions and suggesting a potential link between this celestial event and a volcanic discharge that drifted to Earth.

Fort then examines the 1917 appearance of a new star in the constellation Hercules, discovered by a professional astronomer, albeit through the belated analysis of photographic plates. He connects this event to a disastrous earthquake in Italy that occurred the following day and the strong seismic waves recorded by seismographs worldwide a few days later, suggesting a potential link between this new star appearance and a powerful earthquake occurring within the starry shell, transmitting energy to Earth through teleportative currents. He criticizes the astronomers’ three-year delay in recognizing the new star’s presence on their photographic plates, suggesting that their reliance on slow and methodical analysis, prioritizing abstract calculations over direct observation, hinders their ability to recognize and respond to dynamic celestial events.

He then analyzes the 1918 fall of black rain in Ireland, followed by a mysterious red glare observed in the sky across Europe and North America. He connects these events to the falls of dust observed in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Vermont shortly afterward, arguing that the widespread distribution of these dust falls, coupled with the unusual red glare, suggests a volcanic eruption occurring outside Earth, potentially linked to a new star appearing in a daytime sky and reflecting its light onto Earth at night. He further connects these events to the impressive 1918 appearance of Nova Aquilae, a new star discovered by two amateur astronomers in India and South Africa, highlighting the fact that a professional astronomer at Greenwich Observatory had actually seen the star but failed to recognize it as a new arrival.

Fort concludes by reiterating the recurring pattern of amateur discoveries of new stars, contrasting their attentiveness to the sky with the professional astronomers’ preoccupation with abstract calculations and their reliance on belated photographic analysis. He suggests that this pattern reveals a fundamental flaw in the conventional astronomical approach, hindering our understanding of the true nature of the cosmos. He argues that these new star appearances, often coinciding with terrestrial disturbances and unexplained atmospheric phenomena, offer compelling evidence for a nearby, habitable starry shell, a vast landmass teeming with volcanic activity and interconnected to Earth through teleportative currents. He encourages a more open-minded and observant approach to astronomy, recognizing the value of amateur contributions and challenging the dogmatism of the professional establishment, potentially paving the way for a revolutionary understanding of the cosmos and our place within it.

Chapter 31:

Fort brings his exploration of astronomical anomalies and unexplained phenomena to a climax, culminating in a powerful restatement of his core arguments and a bold vision of humanity’s future among the stars. He re-emphasizes the limitations of conventional astronomy, its reliance on inaccurate predictions, its dismissive explanations for contradictory data, and its neglect of amateur observations, arguing that these shortcomings impede our understanding of the cosmos and blind us to the possibility of a nearby, habitable starry shell.

He revisits the 1918 eclipse of the sun observed in Oregon, noting the astronomers’ 14-second error in their prediction, a seemingly insignificant discrepancy yet a glaring inaccuracy compared to their claims of minute precision. He criticizes the astronomers’ reliance on intricate calculations and sophisticated instruments, suggesting that their obsession with refinement obscures the fundamental uncertainties underlying their models and masks their failure to grasp the true nature of the cosmos.

Fort then analyzes the 1920 discovery of Nova Cygni III by amateur astronomer W.F. Denning, a star that had brightened significantly over several days and reached a magnitude easily visible to the naked eye. He highlights the professional astronomers’ failure to notice this star, only recognizing its presence on their own photographic plates after Denning’s report prompted them to review their data. He argues that this pattern, recurring throughout his exploration of new star appearances, exposes the astronomers’ reliance on passive, retrospective analysis and their obliviousness to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the cosmos.

He further challenges the astronomers’ claims of accuracy, contrasting their elaborate calculations spanning billions of years with their relatively poor predictions of readily verifiable events. He juxtaposes a lengthy astronomical treatise on “adiabatic expansions” and “convective equilibrium” published in 1922, featuring a diagram printed upside down, with the astronomers’ errors in predicting the eclipse that occurred later that year, off by 16 and 20 seconds. Fort argues that this juxtaposition reveals the absurdity of the astronomers’ pretensions to vast knowledge and precise calculations, their pronouncements on the fate of stars over billions of years rendered laughable by their inability to accurately forecast events occurring in their own celestial backyard.

He then examines several other new star discoveries, highlighting the 1921 discovery of a bright nova in the constellation Aquila, again spotted by amateur astronomers before professional observatories took notice, and the 1923 observation of an increase in brightness in the star Beta Ceti, reported by a 16-year-old schoolboy. He connects the latter event to the fall of yellow dust in Westphalia, potentially a volcanic discharge originating from Beta Ceti and drifting to Earth, further emphasizing the possibility of a direct connection between celestial events and terrestrial phenomena.

Fort concludes by focusing on Nova Pictoris, the star that dramatically increased in brightness in 1925, only to be discovered months later by an amateur astronomer while professional observatories remained oblivious. He highlights the astronomers’ subsequent discovery, through the analysis of archival photographs, that this star had previously shone brightly for 44 nights without being noticed by any professional observer, a revelation that, Fort argues, underscores the profound limitations of conventional astronomy and its reliance on passive data collection. He notes the astronomers’ later announcement, in 1930, of the precise measurement of heat received from a distant, faint star, contrasting this seemingly impressive feat with their earlier failure to observe a nearby, bright star for over a month. He argues that this juxtaposition exposes the absurdity of their claims to vast knowledge and precise measurement, their pronouncements on the faintest whispers of the cosmos rendered meaningless by their inability to perceive the readily observable shouts occurring in their own celestial neighborhood.

Fort reiterates his vision of a nearby, habitable starry shell, a vast landmass potentially teeming with life and interconnected to Earth through teleportative currents. He suggests that this shell, far from being a distant and irrelevant realm, might hold the key to understanding the unexplained phenomena documented throughout his book, from showers of living creatures to mysterious disappearances, from volcanic discharges to earthquakes and deluges. He encourages a more open-minded and observant approach to astronomy, recognizing the value of amateur contributions and challenging the dogmatism of the professional establishment, potentially paving the way for a revolutionary understanding of the cosmos and our place within it. He envisions a future where humans, freed from the constraints of outdated astronomical dogmas, embark on daring expeditions to the stars, exploring this new frontier, discovering new resources, and encountering new forms of life, a future where the celestial wonders currently dismissed as distant and irrelevant become familiar and accessible, transforming our understanding of the universe and our place within it.

Chapter 32:

In the final chapter of “Lo!”, Fort brings his vast collection of unexplained phenomena and his groundbreaking theory of a nearby, habitable starry shell to a resounding crescendo. He reiterates his core arguments, highlighting the interconnectedness of seemingly disparate events and the limitations of conventional explanations, while offering a bold vision of humanity’s future among the stars, a future where exploration, discovery, and a radical shift in our understanding of the cosmos await.

He summarizes the key themes of his work, reminding readers of the recurring patterns observed throughout his exploration of astronomical anomalies and terrestrial disturbances:

  • The prevalence of “new stars,” often discovered by amateur astronomers while professional observatories remain oblivious, suggesting that significant changes occur in the stars despite their alleged vast distances and challenging the conventional model of a static and unchanging cosmos.
  • The correlation between new star appearances and terrestrial disturbances like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and unexplained atmospheric phenomena, often localized to specific geographical zones, suggesting a connection between particular areas of Earth and certain regions of the sky, a pattern inconsistent with the conventional astronomical model of a vast and isolated solar system.
  • The existence of “teleportative currents,” a force capable of transporting objects, substances, and even living creatures across vast distances, potentially explaining phenomena like showers of living things, mysterious disappearances, and the sudden appearances of unexplained creatures and objects.
  • The concept of “organic control,” a force guiding events within our existence, orchestrating seemingly unrelated occurrences to maintain balance and facilitate growth and development, operating according to a plan beyond human comprehension, yet potentially benevolent in its ultimate purpose.

Fort argues that these themes, woven together, point to a more intimate and interconnected cosmos than envisioned by conventional astronomy, a cosmos where Earth is not an isolated planet orbiting a distant sun, but rather a vital part of a larger organism, a cosmic entity with its own internal processes and mechanisms for maintaining balance and facilitating change. He suggests that the starry shell, far from being a distant and irrelevant realm, might hold the key to understanding the unexplained phenomena documented throughout his book, from showers of frogs to mysterious disappearances, from volcanic discharges to earthquakes and deluges.

He envisions a future where humanity, freed from the constraints of outdated astronomical dogmas, embraces a more comprehensive and interconnected view of the universe, recognizing the significance of amateur observations, challenging the authority of the professional establishment, and exploring the starry shell with the same pioneering spirit that drove our ancestors to explore uncharted lands and seas. He imagines a future where:

  • The Milky Way, far from being a distant galaxy, becomes a familiar and accessible celestial “Broadway,” teeming with human activity and illuminated by the signs and symbols of our expanding civilization.
  • Teleportation becomes a practical technology, allowing instantaneous travel between Earth and the starry shell, facilitating exploration, trade, and communication.
  • New forms of life are discovered on the starry shell, expanding our understanding of biology and challenging our anthropocentric perspective.
  • The mysteries documented in “Lo!”, currently dismissed as inexplicable or relegated to the realm of fringe science, become integrated into a new, more comprehensive scientific paradigm, transforming our understanding of the cosmos and our place within it.

Fort concludes by challenging readers to embrace the unknown, to question conventional wisdom, and to consider the possibility of a more wondrous and interconnected universe than we ever imagined. He suggests that “Lo!”, far from being a mere collection of curiosities and unexplained events, represents a glimpse into the true nature of our existence, a glimpse that, if properly understood, can lead us to a new era of exploration, discovery, and a profound shift in our understanding of the cosmos and our place within it. He leaves us with a sense of wonder, a sense of possibility, and a challenge to embrace the unknown with open minds and adventurous spirits, ready to embark on a journey to the stars.

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