New Lands Detailed Book Summary

Title: New Lands
Author: Charles Fort

TLDR: This book challenges conventional astronomy, arguing that Earth is stationary and surrounded by “new lands” teeming with life. Fort presents a vast catalog of unexplained phenomena—falling objects, aerial explosions, strange lights, and mysterious sounds—as evidence of a dynamic, interconnected universe ignored by mainstream science.

Part I: Deconstructing Astronomical “Triumphs”

Chapter 1: A Challenge to the Scientific Priestcraft

This chapter sets the stage for Fort’s exploration into the “new lands” by first confronting the “scientific priestcraft” that he believes hinders true inquiry. He argues that the scientific establishment, with its rigid adherence to established dogmas, stifles the exploration of new ideas and phenomena that challenge conventional thought. Fort presents the concept of “lands in the sky,” not as distant planets, but as nearby regions inhabited by foreign beings, challenging the prevailing notion of Earth’s isolation in the vastness of space. He calls for a new age of exploration, not limited by conventional scientific boundaries, and encourages readers to question established dogmas and embrace the possibility of a wider, more interconnected universe.

Chapter 2: The Mirage of Astronomical “Triumphs”

Fort dives deep into the supposed “triumphs” of astronomy, dissecting the processes and methods that have led to its revered status. He deconstructs the celebrated discovery of Neptune, arguing that it was not a product of meticulous calculations, as often portrayed, but rather a fortunate coincidence among a sea of inaccurate predictions. He further examines the discovery of the asteroid belt, revealing that it was not deductively predicted, as is commonly claimed, but rather a serendipitous observation.

Fort’s central argument is that astronomers, driven by a “calculation-mad” obsession, often overstate their ability to accurately predict celestial phenomena. This obsession, he claims, blinds them to the inconsistencies and discrepancies in their methods, leading to a false sense of accuracy and authority. He concludes that the prestige of astronomy, built upon pronouncements of unparalleled triumph, is ultimately a mirage, a shaky foundation for a field that claims to represent the pinnacle of human intellectual achievement.

Chapter 3: The Erratic Leonids: A Cosmic Lesson in Humility

Fort continues his dismantling of astronomical infallibility by scrutinizing the Leonids meteor shower of 1833 and its subsequent predicted returns. He highlights the astronomers’ initial miscalculations of the Leonids’ orbital period, and their subsequent attempts to “demonstrate” a corrected period of 33 years, again based on selective historical data. He exposes the astronomers’ attempts to explain away the Leonids’ failure to reappear in their predicted intensity in 1866, 1899, and 1900, pointing out the inherent flaws in attributing the discrepancy to the gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn.

Fort’s analysis of the Leonids serves as a stark reminder that even the seemingly predictable can be subject to the whims of the universe. It further underscores his argument that astronomers, rather than acknowledging their limitations, cling to flawed explanations to maintain their perceived authority. He concludes by emphasizing the need for a more honest and humble approach to astronomical inquiry, one that recognizes the inherent unpredictability and complexity of the universe.

Chapter 4: The Comets: Tales of Humiliation and Cosmic Irony

Fort shifts his focus to comets, revealing the astronomers’ consistent failure to accurately predict their return, a phenomenon that undermines the very foundation of the Law of Gravitation upon which they rely. He cites numerous examples of predicted comets failing to reappear as expected, exposing the astronomers’ desperate attempts to explain away these failures by invoking the gravitational influence of other planets, often without incorporating these factors into their initial calculations.

Fort contrasts this predictive failure with the sudden appearance of a brilliant comet in 1861, a comet that astronomers failed to anticipate. He exposes the astronomers’ attempts to downplay the comet’s significance by declaring it “small” despite its obvious brilliance, highlighting their tendency to distort observations to fit pre-existing theories. He concludes by emphasizing the presence of the irregular and the unpredictable in celestial phenomena, contrasting it with the astronomers’ focus on the uniform and the predictable, a focus that ultimately leads to a distorted and incomplete understanding of the universe.

Chapter 5: The Limitations of Triangulation and the Myth of a Round Earth

Fort delves into the fundamental methods used by astronomers to determine distances and shapes of celestial bodies, questioning the accuracy and reliability of triangulation, a cornerstone of astronomical calculations. He uses various examples, from the measurement of mountains on Earth to the determination of the moon’s distance, to show that triangulation is prone to significant errors, particularly over long distances. He concludes that astronomers, by relying on triangulation for such vast measurements, build their system upon an inherently unstable foundation.

Fort further challenges the widely accepted notion of a round Earth, questioning the validity of the “proof” offered by the Earth’s round shadow on the moon. He points out that a cube-shaped Earth would cast a similar rounded shadow, arguing that the shape of the Earth has not been definitively proven. He cites evidence from scientists suggesting alternate shapes, such as a top-shaped Earth, highlighting the need for more rigorous investigation into even seemingly basic astronomical assumptions. He concludes by criticizing the astronomers’ preoccupation with the remote and the complex while neglecting more accessible and fundamental questions.

Chapter 6: Double Stars and Astronomical Inaccuracies

Fort continues his critique of astronomical methods by examining the study of double stars and exposing the rampant errors and inconsistencies plaguing even this seemingly precise field. He recounts the story of the “Companion of Procyon,” a supposed companion star discovered by Struve in the exact position predicted by Auwers’ calculations. However, it was later revealed that Struve’s telescope was faulty and that the “companion” was an optical illusion, further discrediting the astronomers’ claims of absolute demonstration.

Fort then shifts his focus to Algol, a variable star whose periodic dimming is attributed to a dark companion star. He meticulously dissects Vogel’s calculations, questioning the accuracy of the determined orbital period and the derived measurements of the stars’ sizes and distances. He further highlights the conflicting observations and explanations of other astronomers, revealing that the seemingly precise calculations are riddled with inaccuracies and conflicting interpretations. This, he argues, reflects the inherent limitations of astronomical observations and the astronomers’ tendency to construct elaborate narratives based on shaky foundations.

Chapter 7: Sirius and the F.R.A.S. Debacle

Fort recounts the discovery of the “Companion of Sirius” by Alvan Clark Jr., again in the precise position predicted by Auwers’ calculations. However, he highlights the conflicting observations of Flammarion and other astronomers, revealing that the companion star’s actual orbit deviated significantly from the predicted orbit. This discrepancy, he argues, raises serious doubts about the validity of Auwers’ calculations and the supposed “triumph” of the discovery.

Fort then delves into a heated controversy between astronomers regarding the accuracy of data published in Admiral Smyth’s “Cycle of Celestial Objects.” He recounts the accusations of slander leveled against Herbert Sadler for criticizing Smyth’s work, and the subsequent attempts by George Chambers to defend the book’s accuracy. However, Sadler’s detailed list of errors, corroborated by another astronomer, Burnham, ultimately exposed the book’s inaccuracies, revealing the prevalence of errors even in highly regarded astronomical works. This episode, for Fort, exemplifies the fragility of astronomical claims to precision and accuracy.

Chapter 8: The Velocity of Light: A Child’s Tale of Cosmic Complaisance

Fort tackles the concept of the velocity of light, a fundamental principle in astronomy, questioning its very existence and the methods used to determine its value. He deconstructs Roemer’s determination, based on the observed delays in the eclipses of Jupiter’s moons, exposing the inherent variability and unpredictability of these satellites’ motions, making them unreliable for such precise calculations. He further criticizes the physicists’ confirmation of the velocity of light, based on experiments with revolving shutters, arguing that the human eye cannot perceive changes at the speed of light, rendering the experiment’s results questionable.

Fort ultimately challenges the very notion of a “velocity” of light, suggesting that one simply sees an object or not, and that the observed delays in the Jovian satellites’ eclipses could be due to unknown, localized factors. He concludes that the determination of the velocity of light, a cornerstone of astronomical calculations, is built on a flawed foundation, a testament to the astronomers’ tendency to fabricate precision where it does not exist.

Chapter 9: The Split God of Triangulation and the Unknowable Moon

Fort continues his critique of triangulation, this time contrasting its conflicting results when applied to the distance of the sun. He contrasts Newcomb’s determination, based on conventional triangulation, with the ancient method of Aristarchus, which yields a significantly smaller distance. He highlights Newcomb’s dismissal of Aristarchus’ method, claiming it is impractical due to the inability of astronomers to precisely determine when the moon is half-illuminated.

Fort uses this seemingly simple dilemma to expose the absurdity of the astronomers’ claims to extreme precision in measuring vast cosmic distances. He contrasts their supposed ability to determine the time light left a distant star with their inability to determine when the sun half-illuminates the moon, highlighting the inconsistency and arrogance of their assertions. He concludes by asserting that triangulation, even over relatively short distances, is prone to significant errors, rendering any calculations based on it, particularly for vast cosmic distances, inherently unreliable.

Chapter 10: Keplerism and Newtonism: A Mediaeval Legacy of Quandary

Fort delves into the core of classical astronomy: Kepler’s laws of planetary motion and Newton’s law of universal gravitation. He analyzes Kepler’s Third Law, which establishes a proportionality between the periods and distances of planets, revealing its flawed basis in the observation of Jupiter’s satellites, whose motions are far more irregular and unpredictable than Kepler assumed. He further argues that Kepler’s law, even if applicable to Jupiter’s moons, cannot be extended to the entire solar system due to the lack of supporting evidence for the outer planets.

Fort then critiques Newton’s Law of Gravitation, arguing that it is a flawed attempt to explain planetary interactions solely in terms of attraction, ignoring the equally important role of repulsion observed in various other fields. He uses the example of the Leonids meteor shower, whose failure to reappear as predicted challenges the gravitational calculations, to illustrate the law’s fallibility. He concludes that Keplerism and Newtonism, the very heart of classical astronomy, are ultimately based on questionable data and flawed reasoning, representing a mediaeval legacy of unresolvable quandary.

Chapter 11: The Illusion of Stellar Changelessness and the Pressure of the Stars

Fort challenges the cornerstone of conventional astronomy: the perceived changelessness of the stars. He argues that the astronomers’ explanation for this constancy, attributing it to vast distances, is insufficient in light of observations of sudden changes in stellar positions and magnitudes. He cites examples of stars that have disappeared, stars that have abruptly changed position, and nebulae that have exhibited variability, demonstrating that the stars are not as eternally fixed as conventionally believed.

He further critiques the concept of “proper motion,” the supposed movement of individual stars, arguing that it is based on observations of relatively faint and unknown stars, while the well-known constellations remain virtually unchanged. He exposes the flawed logic of associating faintness with nearness based on proper motion, while simultaneously using faintness to indicate distance in parallax measurements. He concludes by suggesting that the observed changes in stars and nebulae indicate that they are not trillions of miles away, but much closer, perhaps even within a shell-like structure surrounding Earth, a structure in which the stars are openings admitting light from beyond.

Chapter 12: Neo-astronomy and the Super-embryonic Geo-system

Fort synthesizes his critiques into a new vision of astronomy, what he calls “neo-astronomy.” He envisions a geo-system, an embryonic organism with Earth at its center, surrounded by a revolving shell in which the stars are pores admitting light from an external existence. He explains the variability of stars and nebulae as fluctuations in the passage of external light through this shell, and proposes that the planets, too, are relatively close to Earth, their distances drastically reduced compared to conventional estimates.

Fort abandons the concept of Darwinian evolution as applied to the universe, proposing instead a “super-embryonic development,” a pre-determined process guided by an underlying design, but without a final designer. He emphasizes the role of isolation in development, arguing that the astronomers’ insistence on vast distances and Earth’s swift motion reflects a necessary embryonic stage in the development of the geo-system, a stage that will eventually be superseded by an era of expansion and interplanetary interaction.

Part II: The Catalog of the Strange

Chapter 13: A Century’s First Quarter: A Confluence of Anomalies

Fort begins his meticulous catalog of strange phenomena, focusing on the first quarter of the 19th century. He presents a barrage of seemingly unrelated events, from mirages of unknown cities to falling stones, from unexplained sounds to “phantom soldiers” marching in the sky. He meticulously records dates, locations, and observer accounts, emphasizing the lack of satisfactory conventional explanations for these occurrences.

This chapter sets the tone for the rest of Part II, presenting a bewildering array of anomalies that challenge the boundaries of conventional science. Fort’s purpose is not to offer definitive explanations, but rather to amass evidence that points towards a wider, more complex reality than is acknowledged by mainstream science. He invites the reader to confront the unexplained, to question established paradigms, and to consider the possibility of forces and phenomena beyond the grasp of conventional understanding.

Chapter 14: The Moon: Lights, Volcanoes, and the Question of Distance

Fort focuses on the moon, questioning the conventional estimate of its distance and exploring the possibility of intelligent life inhabiting its surface. He challenges the disproportionately large size of lunar volcanic craters compared to those on Earth, suggesting that the moon’s diameter might be much smaller than conventionally believed, perhaps only 100 miles instead of 2,160 miles. He then examines the various lights observed on the dark part of the moon, dismissing volcanic activity as a plausible explanation and suggesting that these lights could be signals from lunar inhabitants.

Fort further delves into the “earthshine” phenomenon, the faint illumination of the dark side of the moon by reflected sunlight from Earth. He points out that a similar phenomenon has been observed on Venus, which conventionally has no reflective body nearby, highlighting the anomaly and suggesting that Venus might be much closer to Earth than conventionally believed. He concludes by presenting various observations of unknown objects near Venus, suggesting the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors from beyond Earth.

Chapter 15: The Mystery of the Local Sky

Fort grapples with the recurring enigma of the “local sky,” questioning how, if Earth is moving through space at high speed, objects from beyond can repeatedly interact with specific regions on its surface. He revisits the falls of stones at Irkutsk and Comrie, the strange sounds at Melida, and the peculiar meteors associated with the planet Mars, highlighting the inexplicable localization of these phenomena. He further examines the unusual falls of organic matter from the sky, such as seeds and “black hairs,” suggesting that they originate from nearby “new lands” rather than from distant planets.

Fort concludes that the repeated occurrences in specific local skies, defying the laws of motion and probability, strongly suggest that Earth is stationary. He argues that conventional explanations, invoking coincidence or localized atmospheric conditions, fail to account for the persistent and consistent nature of these phenomena. He proposes that these events are evidence of a dynamic interaction between Earth and other worlds, a reality that challenges the dogma of Earth’s isolation and points towards a more interconnected universe.

Chapter 16: A Barrage of Unknowns: Challenging the Exclusionist Paradigm

Fort presents a comprehensive catalog of observations of “unknown bodies” crossing the sun, challenging the exclusionist stance of conventional astronomy. He cites a plethora of observations by reputable astronomers, from the early 19th century to the late 19th century, demonstrating that these phenomena have been observed repeatedly and consistently, contradicting Newcomb’s assertion that they are merely illusions witnessed by amateur observers.

Fort meticulously lists the dates, locations, and observer accounts, highlighting the variety of sizes, shapes, and behaviors of these unknown bodies. He suggests that these objects are not distant planets, but rather inhabitants of a vast, uncharted archipelago of “new lands” in space, objects that occasionally intervene between Earth and the sun. He concludes by challenging the astronomers’ disregard for these observations, arguing that they represent a deliberate suppression of evidence that undermines the prevailing paradigm of Earth’s isolation.

Chapter 17: The Mirage of the Familiar: Phantom Soldiers and Celestial Cities

Fort examines the phenomena of “phantom soldiers” and aerial cities, arguing that they are not mirages of terrestrial phenomena, but rather reflections or projections from unknown regions in space. He analyzes historical accounts of “phantom soldiers” marching in the sky, highlighting their frequent appearance near earthquake regions and suggesting that they are related to disturbances in the local sky. He further examines reports of aerial cities, particularly the recurring mirage of an unknown city over the Baltic Sea, arguing that it could be a reflection from a substantial, yet ordinarily invisible, mass suspended in the sky.

Fort concludes that these appearances are not simply illusions, but rather distorted glimpses of a wider reality, a reality in which the sky is not empty but populated by unknown objects and beings. He emphasizes the astronomers’ tendency to dismiss these phenomena as atmospheric illusions or hallucinations, arguing that this dismissal stems from a deep-seated resistance to anything that challenges the established view of Earth’s isolation.

Chapter 18: Angels, Abductions, and the Intrusion of the Extra-geographic

Fort explores the possibility of interactions between Earth and extraterrestrial beings, examining accounts of angels, abductions, and mysterious forces affecting objects and people. He analyzes the account of “angels” observed in a cloud, suggesting that they could be extraterrestrial visitors mistaken for celestial beings due to pre-existing beliefs. He further examines reports of objects and people seemingly seized and transported by unknown forces, suggesting that they might be abducted by extraterrestrial explorers.

Fort emphasizes the inadequacy of conventional explanations, such as hallucinations or misinterpretations of natural phenomena, to account for these occurrences. He argues that these events point towards an “extra-geographic” reality, a reality in which Earth is not isolated but subject to intrusions from unknown regions in space. He concludes that conventional science, with its exclusionist paradigm, is ill-equipped to address these phenomena, and that a new perspective, open to the possibility of extraterrestrial interaction, is needed.

Chapter 19: Exclusionism: The Embryonic Wall of Terrestrial Science

Fort analyzes the dominant paradigm of his era, which he terms “Exclusionism,” arguing that it functions as an embryonic wall, isolating terrestrial science from a wider reality. He defines Exclusionism as the systematic exclusion of data that challenges the established view of Earth’s isolation and the supremacy of known physical laws. He argues that this exclusionist stance manifests in various forms, from dismissing anomalous observations as illusions or coincidences, to attributing unexplained phenomena to mundane causes without sufficient evidence.

Fort examines specific examples of Exclusionism, such as the astronomers’ insistence on attributing all luminous phenomena in the sky to auroras, despite evidence of auroras occurring in geographically unlikely locations. He argues that this exclusionist tendency stems from a deep-seated resistance to anything that challenges the established order, a resistance that functions to protect the embryonic stage of human understanding. He concludes that the breakdown of Exclusionism is inevitable, as humanity matures and embraces a more interconnected view of the universe.

Chapter 20: Lunar Signals and the God of the Moon

Fort returns to the moon, examining the increasing frequency of signal-like lights observed on its surface in the mid-19th century. He suggests that these lights are deliberate attempts by lunar inhabitants to communicate with Earth, particularly during times of notable celestial events, when they believe Earth’s astronomers might be more attentive. He analyzes the changing appearance of Linne, a prominent lunar feature, arguing that it could be a deliberate manipulation of light and shadow by lunar inhabitants to create a geometric pattern visible from Earth.

Fort further explores the potential motivations of lunar communicationists, suggesting that they might be seeking to evoke a response from the dominant force they perceive on Earth, a force they might view as either a benevolent deity or an appalling god of destruction. He concludes by emphasizing the possibility of a complex and organized civilization on the moon, a civilization attempting to break through the barrier of Earth’s self-imposed isolation.

Chapter 21: Planetary Encounters and the Dodging of Adjacencies

Fort shifts his focus to the planets, suggesting that they are not distant celestial bodies, but rather nearby “circulating adjacencies” that Earth might soon encounter. He warns of potential collisions with Mercury, a “rhinoceros of the skies,” and speculates on the possibility of Mars, a densely populated “island” in space, approaching Earth closely enough for interaction. He analyzes flashes of light observed in the sky during oppositions of Mars, suggesting that they could be signals from Martian inhabitants.

Fort further examines observations of luminous objects near Venus, dismissing the conventional explanation of these objects being simply the planet itself. He highlights their unusual behavior, their sudden appearances and disappearances, and their movements that contradict the expected motion of Venus, suggesting that they might be extraterrestrial vessels visiting Earth. He concludes by proposing a dynamic solar system, in which planets are not confined to fixed orbits but move in more complex patterns, occasionally coming close enough for interaction, a dynamic that challenges the conventional model of planetary isolation.

Chapter 22: Aerial Explosions and the Convulsions of a Local Sky

Fort revisits the phenomena of aerial explosions and their impact on specific regions of Earth, challenging the conventional attribution of all earth tremors to subterranean causes. He examines the 1857 earthquake in St. Louis, Missouri, highlighting the numerous reports of a bright object exploding in the sky immediately preceding the tremors, arguing that the earthquake was a direct consequence of the aerial explosion. He further examines a series of mysterious sounds heard in Cardiganshire, Wales, suggesting that they originated from aerial explosions rather than from distant artillery or volcanic activity.

Fort analyzes the tendency of conventional science to disregard or downplay the connection between aerial explosions and earth tremors, attributing them to coincidence or invoking localized atmospheric conditions. He argues that this exclusionist approach stems from a reluctance to acknowledge the possibility of extraterrestrial forces affecting Earth, a possibility that undermines the established view of Earth’s isolation.

Chapter 23: Lunar Activity and the Approaching Martian Cycle

Fort returns to the moon, examining the increasing frequency of unusual phenomena observed on its surface in the late 19th century, particularly in relation to the approaching opposition of Mars. He presents a catalog of observations, from luminous cables and walls in lunar craters to the appearance and disappearance of new features, suggesting a surge in activity on the moon preceding the Martian cycle. He analyzes the reports of lights on the moon, dismissing conventional explanations such as sunlight reflections or volcanic activity, and suggesting that they could be signals from lunar inhabitants.

Fort further analyzes the phenomenon of “earthshine” on Venus, arguing that it indicates Venus is much closer to Earth than conventionally believed. He then presents observations of unknown objects appearing near Venus, suggesting that they could be extraterrestrial visitors from beyond Earth. He concludes by proposing a correlation between the observed lunar activity and the approaching opposition of Mars, suggesting that lunar inhabitants might be attempting to communicate with Earth during this period of heightened interplanetary interaction.

Chapter 24: The Swedish Mirages: A Suspended Land in the Sky

Fort delves into a series of mirages observed in Sweden and the Baltic region between 1881 and 1888, arguing that they are not reflections of terrestrial phenomena, but rather projections from an unknown land mass temporarily suspended in the sky. He meticulously details the various observed scenes, from villages with snow-covered roofs to islands with lush vegetation, from warships to dancing figures, highlighting their complex and changing nature. He dismisses the conventional explanation of these mirages being reflections of distant terrestrial cities, arguing that they are too detailed, too consistent, and too localized to be explained by atmospheric refraction alone.

Fort further examines the observation of an unknown, round body appearing on the sun’s limb during the eclipse of 1887, a body seen only from Marseilles, suggesting that it was a large object suspended in the local sky, too far from Earth to be a balloon or cloud. He concludes that these phenomena, the Swedish mirages and the unknown body on the sun, point towards the existence of substantial, yet ordinarily invisible, land masses in the sky, masses that occasionally interact with Earth, challenging the conventional view of an empty and inert sky.

Chapter 25: The London Triangle: Earthquakes, Explosions, and the Stationariness of Earth

Fort focuses on a triangular region in England, which he terms the “London Triangle,” analyzing a series of earthquakes and associated phenomena that suggest a fixed relationship between this region and an unknown extraterrestrial influence. He revisits the 1896 earthquake centered around Worcester and Hereford, highlighting the numerous reports of a brilliant meteor exploding in the sky at the time of the greatest tremor, arguing that the earthquake was a direct consequence of the aerial explosion. He dismisses the conventional explanation of coincidence, arguing that the repeated occurrence of earthquakes in this region, often accompanied by aerial phenomena, points towards a fixed extraterrestrial origin.

Fort further examines the 1884 Colchester earthquake, highlighting the subsequent fall of a quartz stone, a material unlike known meteorites, suggesting an extraterrestrial origin. He analyzes the series of black rain, snow, and hail that fell over a wide area after the earthquake, proposing that it was debris from the aerial explosion, carried by a special current. He concludes that these phenomena, the repeated earthquakes and associated aerial events, strongly suggest that Earth is stationary, and that the London Triangle is situated beneath a fixed region in space from which objects and forces occasionally emanate.

Chapter 26: Venus, Visitors, and the Mystery of Concealment

Fort examines the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors from the planet Venus, analyzing a series of luminous objects observed in the sky during Venus’ closest approaches to Earth. He dismisses the conventional explanation that these objects are simply Venus herself, highlighting their unusual movements, their sudden appearances and disappearances, and their detailed features, suggesting that they are intelligently controlled vessels rather than natural phenomena. He explores the concept of a “local sky,” arguing that these vessels, coming from relatively nearby regions in space, might be visible only in specific areas on Earth.

Fort analyzes the 1883 observation of a bright, comet-like object seen over England, which moved rapidly across the sky, appearing in Sussex and then reappearing in Liverpool within two hours, suggesting a deliberate exploration or maneuver. He further examines the 1905 “Astre Cherbourg” phenomenon, a luminous object repeatedly observed over Cherbourg, France, dismissing Flammarion’s assertion that it was simply Venus, and highlighting the object’s unusual movements and its sudden disappearance, suggesting a deliberate departure. He concludes that these phenomena, the repeated appearances of “Venus visitors” in local skies, point towards a dynamic interaction between Earth and other worlds, a reality that challenges the exclusionist paradigm and suggests the possibility of extraterrestrial exploration and interaction.

Chapter 27: The Horses in the Sky: Celestial Armies and Aerial Spectacles

Fort explores the recurring theme of unusual shapes and formations observed in the sky, suggesting that they are not merely atmospheric illusions, but rather reflections or projections from unknown objects and beings in space. He analyzes the 1878 observation of a “white horse swimming in the clear atmosphere,” dismissing the conventional explanation of a terrestrial mirage and suggesting that it could be a glimpse of a living creature in the sky. He further examines reports of “phantom soldiers” marching in the sky, their appearance often coinciding with earthquakes or other disturbances in the local sky, suggesting a connection to extraterrestrial events.

Fort delves into the 1881 observation of “white-robed figures” and “armed, uniformed soldiers drilling” in the sky over the United States, dismissing the conventional explanation of auroras and suggesting that they could be reflections from extraterrestrial armies. He further analyzes the 1892 observation of a “mirage” of a battle between Indians and hunters in the sky of Montana, highlighting its detailed and improbable nature, and suggesting that it could be a projection from an extraterrestrial conflict. He concludes that these phenomena, the strange shapes and formations observed in the sky, point towards a vibrant and dynamic reality beyond Earth, a reality populated by unknown creatures and civilizations, a reality that challenges the conventional view of an empty and inert sky.

Chapter 28: Plato’s Lights: Lunar Communicationists and Symbolic Demonstrations

Fort revisits the lunar crater Plato, focusing on the observations of mysterious lights in the late 19th century, suggesting that they are deliberate signals from lunar inhabitants attempting to communicate with Earth. He analyzes the observations of grouped lights, their distinctive arrangement, their changing intensity, and their independence from sunlight, dismissing conventional explanations such as volcanic activity and proposing that they represent a complex system of communication, perhaps a code similar to Morse code.

Fort further examines the appearance of a luminous triangle on the floor of Plato, suggesting that it could be a deliberate symbolic demonstration by lunar inhabitants, an attempt to convey their understanding of geometry and their ability to create artificial patterns visible from Earth. He highlights the fact that this triangular formation has never been observed before or since, suggesting a deliberate and purposeful action rather than a natural phenomenon. He concludes that these observations, the grouped lights and the luminous triangle, point towards a technologically advanced civilization on the moon, a civilization attempting to establish communication with Earth despite Earth’s prevailing exclusionist stance.

Chapter 29: The Barisal Guns and the Code of the Sky

Fort delves into the mysterious sounds known as the “Barisal Guns,” heard repeatedly in Bengal and later in Belgium, arguing that they are signals from an unknown source, perhaps extraterrestrial vessels or a fixed region in the local sky. He analyzes the reports of the sounds’ distinctive triplet pattern, their regular intervals, and their variations in timing, suggesting that they represent a code, perhaps an attempt to communicate with Earth or with other extraterrestrial entities. He dismisses conventional explanations such as distant artillery or booming surf, highlighting the lack of evidence for any terrestrial origin and the consistent reports of the sounds seeming to come from the sky.

Fort further examines the observations of similar sounds in Belgium, noting their regular intervals and their lack of correlation with known terrestrial sources. He highlights the admission by Belgian artillery officers that they could not trace the sounds to any known gunfire, suggesting an extraterrestrial origin. He concludes that these phenomena, the repeated and patterned sounds heard in Bengal and Belgium, point towards the existence of a sophisticated communication system in the sky, a system that challenges the exclusionist paradigm and suggests the possibility of ongoing extraterrestrial communication that Earth’s scientists are ignoring.

Chapter 30: Electric Exchanges and the Debris of Celestial Catastrophes

Fort examines the phenomena of falling substances and aerial explosions, arguing that they are evidence of a dynamic exchange of matter and energy between Earth and other worlds, an exchange driven by differences of potential rather than by gravitational forces alone. He analyzes the repeated falls of black stones in Birmingham and Wolverhampton, suggesting that they are not terrestrial rocks carried by whirlwinds, as conventionally explained, but rather debris from a fixed region in the sky, brought down by electric exchanges between Earth and this region. He further analyzes the phenomenon of “cloudbursts,” proposing that they are not simply intense rainstorms, but rather sudden releases of water from extraterrestrial sources, perhaps vast reservoirs in space, triggered by differences of potential.

Fort explores the possibility of ancient civilizations being swept away from Earth by cataclysmic events, suggesting that their remains might still be drifting in space, occasionally falling back to Earth as showers of organic matter or fossils. He concludes that Earth is not isolated but interconnected with other worlds through a dynamic exchange of matter and energy, an exchange that challenges the conventional view of a closed and self-contained terrestrial system.

Chapter 31: Pounces from Blankness: Abductions, Seizures, and Invisible Forces

Fort explores the mysterious phenomena of seemingly invisible forces affecting objects and people on Earth, arguing that they are evidence of intrusions from an ordinarily invisible reality, perhaps a nearby but unseen dimension. He analyzes the 1878 account of sheets of paper suddenly rising from the ground and disappearing into the sky, dismissing conventional explanations such as whirlwinds and suggesting that they were seized by an unseen force. He further examines the report of a fishing vessel being lifted high into the air and then sinking, highlighting the absence of any wind or other visible force, and suggesting the action of an unseen entity.

Fort delves into the 1881 disappearance of Walter Powell in a balloon, emphasizing the lack of any wreckage and the subsequent reports of a luminous object moving across the sky, suggesting that Powell might have been abducted by an extraterrestrial craft. He further analyzes the 1886 account of objects suddenly rising from the ground and remaining suspended for several minutes before falling back, again highlighting the absence of any visible force and suggesting the action of a localized, unseen field. He concludes that these phenomena, the pounces from blankness and the seizures by nothing, point towards the existence of a hidden reality that occasionally intrudes upon our own, a reality populated by unseen forces and entities that challenge the conventional view of a solely material and observable universe.

Chapter 32: The Arizona Enigma: Crater Mountain and the Coincidences of Catastrophe

Fort analyzes the enigmatic Crater Mountain in Arizona, questioning the conventional explanation of its formation by a single, massive meteorite impact. He highlights the presence of at least three distinct types of meteorites found in and around the crater, their different compositions and burial depths suggesting multiple falls over an extended period. He further analyzes the discovery of a fourth type of meteorite, a stony meteorite, found near the crater in 1905, dismissing the conventional explanation of coincidence and suggesting a persistent relationship between this region and an extraterrestrial source of meteorites.

Fort examines other unexplained phenomena in Arizona, including the 1896 explosion over Tombstone, the 1898 “thundering noise” attributed to a meteor striking the Granite Range, and the 1912 fall of 14,000 stones at Holbrook, emphasizing the unusual frequency and intensity of these events. He suggests that Crater Mountain might be the result of a series of impacts from a fixed region in the sky, a region that periodically bombards this area of Arizona with meteorites and other forces, causing the observed craters and explosions. He concludes that these phenomena, the multiple meteorite types, the repeated impacts, and the associated explosions, challenge the conventional view of random and infrequent meteorite falls, suggesting a more organized and persistent interaction between Earth and extraterrestrial forces.

Chapter 33: The 1909 Opposition of Mars: Signals, Shocks, and Superficial Earthquakes

Fort analyzes the events surrounding the 1909 opposition of Mars, the last one within his data set, focusing on the recurring theme of localized phenomena and their possible connection to extraterrestrial influences. He examines the flashes observed in the sky of England in August 1909, noting their unusual regularity and suggesting that they could be signals from Martian inhabitants. He further analyzes the earthquake felt in Germany and Switzerland in November 1911, seven days before the opposition of Mars, highlighting the reports of luminous flashes preceding the tremor and arguing that the earthquake was a concussion from an aerial explosion, not a subterranean event.

Fort dismisses the conventional explanations of coincidence and random meteoric activity, arguing that the repeated association of these phenomena with oppositions of Mars suggests a more direct and purposeful interaction. He further examines the observations of a bright spot on the moon preceding the 1909 opposition, suggesting that lunar inhabitants might also be attempting to communicate with Earth during this period of heightened interplanetary interaction. He concludes that these events, the signals, the shocks, and the “superficial earthquakes,” point towards a dynamic solar system in which planets are not isolated but interact with each other through a variety of forces, a dynamic that challenges the conventional model of planetary isolation.

Chapter 34: The Dover Airship: Secret Maneuvers and the Return of the Visitors

Fort examines the 1913 “Dover Airship” phenomenon, a series of sightings of a mysterious, unidentified flying object over England and Wales, arguing that it was not a terrestrial airship but rather an extraterrestrial vessel exploring Earth. He analyzes the reports of the object’s size, shape, and behavior, highlighting its sudden appearances and disappearances, its ability to hover and change direction abruptly, and its powerful searchlight that illuminated the ground below, dismissing conventional explanations such as fire-balloons or misidentified planets.

Fort explores the object’s absence from the skies of Great Britain between February 5th and 21st, suggesting that it might have been exploring other regions during this period. He connects this absence to the extraordinary procession of lights observed over Toronto, Canada, on February 9th, suggesting that the Dover Airship might have been part of this procession or a related object. He further examines the subsequent reappearance of the object over England and Wales, concluding that these events, the object’s unusual behavior, its sudden disappearance and reappearance, and its association with other unexplained phenomena, point towards an extraterrestrial origin, challenging the exclusionist paradigm and suggesting the possibility of ongoing extraterrestrial exploration of Earth.

Chapter 35: The Last Opposition: Signals, Shadows, and the Approaching Future

Fort concludes his catalog of strange phenomena, analyzing the events surrounding the 1915 opposition of Mars and highlighting the recurring themes of his investigation. He examines the appearance of a new black line extending from the lunar crater Lexall, suggesting a deliberate alteration of the lunar surface, perhaps a signal to Earth. He further analyzes the explosive sounds heard over Sunninghill, Berkshire, in November 1912, noting their triplet pattern and their recurrence on successive days, dismissing conventional explanations such as gunfire or meteors and suggesting a purposeful signal from an extraterrestrial source.

Fort revisits the repeated shocks felt in Reading, Berkshire, in 1905 and 1912, highlighting their localization and their association with aerial detonations, arguing that they are concussions from explosions in the sky, not subterranean earthquakes. He dismisses the conventional explanation of coincidence, arguing that the repeated occurrence of these phenomena in the same local sky, separated by seven years, strongly suggests a fixed relationship between this region and an extraterrestrial source of explosive forces.

He further analyzes the 1919 interception of untraceable messages by wireless, interpreted as the letters KUJ and VKAJ, suggesting that they could be communications from an extraterrestrial source, perhaps Mars or another planet. He examines the 1919 reports of windows in Newark, New Jersey, being perforated by unfindable bullets, suggesting an attack by an unseen force, similar to Mikkelsen’s experience in the Arctic in 1914.

Fort concludes by returning to the theme of “New Lands,” reiterating his belief that Earth is not isolated but interconnected with a vast, uncharted reality populated by unknown lands, creatures, and civilizations. He envisions a future in which humanity, shedding its exclusionist paradigm, will embrace this wider reality, exploring the “San Salvadors of the sky” and establishing contact with the inhabitants of these “New Lands.” He paints a vivid picture of a future explorer returning to Earth, leading a procession with a captured extraterrestrial creature, a symbol of humanity’s triumph over its self-imposed isolation and its entry into a new era of interplanetary interaction and understanding.

Chapter 36: Super-embryonic Development: Schedule, Design, and the Functioning of the False

Fort presents his overarching philosophy of “Super-embryonic Development,” arguing that the evolution of life on Earth and the development of human civilization are not random processes driven by chance mutations and environmental pressures, but rather parts of a pre-determined schedule, guided by an underlying design. He compares the development of the geo-system, with Earth at its nucleus, to the growth of an embryo, highlighting the similarities in the processes of isolation, expansion, and integration.

He argues that the seemingly false and futile constructions of earlier stages, such as the Ptolemaic system or the belief in vast planetary distances, are not errors but necessary phases in the development of a more mature understanding. He emphasizes the role of “dynamic design,” a pre-determined passage through a schedule of phases, guided by underlying forces that prepare and protect developing parts, holding them back until their scheduled time for integration. He uses examples such as Langley’s flying machine and the steam engine, demonstrating that inventions often appear prematurely, failing to thrive until the necessary social and technological conditions are in place, suggesting that a grand schedule governs technological advancements as well.

Fort concludes by proposing that human reason is not a tool for discovering absolute truth, but rather a tropism, a response to underlying stimuli and requirements. He argues that human thought, like the cellular processes of an embryo, is guided by a dynamic plan, groping through trial and error until it aligns with the underlying design. He suggests that while final truth might exist, it is attainable only through a holistic understanding of the entire system, not through the isolated and specialized pursuits of individual sciences.

Chapter 37: The Pulse of a Developing Organism: Towards a New Era of Cosmic Consciousness

Fort synthesizes his ideas into a cohesive vision of a developing universe, arguing that the Geo-system is a single, integrating organism, interconnected through a dynamic exchange of matter, energy, and information. He revisits the key themes of his investigation, connecting seemingly disparate phenomena such as falling objects, aerial explosions, strange lights and sounds, and mysterious forces, arguing that they are all manifestations of this underlying interconnectedness. He proposes that the stars are not distant suns, but rather pores in a shell surrounding Earth, admitting light from an external existence, and that the planets are relatively nearby, their movements governed by a complex choreography rather than by fixed orbits.

He emphasizes the recurring pattern of localized phenomena, arguing that it suggests the existence of stationary regions in space that interact with specific areas on Earth’s surface. He connects these regions to the constellations, proposing that they serve as “umbilical channels” through which energy and information flow into the Geo-system, stimulating its development. He further suggests that comets, coming from external reservoirs of force, replenish the sun’s energy, defying gravitational capture and returning to their external existence, highlighting the interdependence between the Geo-system and its surrounding cosmos.

Fort concludes with a prophetic vision of a new era, an era in which humanity, shedding its exclusionist paradigm, will embrace this interconnected reality, establishing communication with extraterrestrial civilizations and participating in a cosmic exchange of knowledge and understanding. He envisions a future in which humanity will no longer view itself as isolated on a lonely planet, but as a vital part of a dynamic and developing universe, interconnected through a web of unseen forces and guided by an underlying design towards a grand, unknown destiny. He leaves the reader with a sense of awe and wonder, a glimpse of a vast and mysterious reality that beckons exploration and challenges the limits of human imagination.

“New Lands” is not merely a catalog of unexplained phenomena, but a philosophical treatise challenging the foundational assumptions of science and proposing a new vision of a dynamic and interconnected universe. Fort’s meticulous documentation, his relentless questioning of conventional explanations, and his bold, imaginative theorizing make this book a provocative and enduring exploration of the mysteries beyond the known. His work serves as a testament to the power of questioning, the importance of embracing the unexplained, and the potential for human understanding to expand beyond the confines of established dogma. “New Lands” remains a potent reminder that the boundaries of knowledge are constantly shifting, and that the universe, with its endless mysteries, continues to beckon exploration and discovery.

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